Neighbors near LG&E plant upset over fly ash - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Neighbors near LG&E plant upset over fly ash

Posted: Updated:
Stephanie Hogan Stephanie Hogan
Steven Turner Steven Turner

By Katie Bauer email | bio

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) – Neighbors of LG&E's Cane Run Road plant claim it is making their family sick, but the plant says the results are in and that's just not the case.

They are upset over what is called fly ash saying it's all over their homes. The plant uses coal and fly ash is made up of trace amounts of several toxic chemicals including arsenic and mercury.

Stephanie Hogan's two year old Cody loves to be outside. "We let him play, we let him eat the dirt, we let him sit here, just be a boy," said Hogan.

They have lived near the Cane Run LG&E generating station for a little more than year. "He is asthmatic now," said Hogan. They say it's because of the coal ash coming from the plant.

"His allergy doctor is the one that made the comment that we need to move because as long as we live here, he's going to keep getting sick, keep getting sick," said Hogan.

This isn't the first time LG&E has heard these complaints, in fact, the company hired a group to test samples from a few homes and invited a handful of neighbors to tour the facility.

"We work with these materials on a daily basis," said Steven Turner, plant general manager.  "We have exposure to the same materials that the neighbors do and probably more frequently and at higher levels, so we are very concerned about the health affects."

LG&E says they are operating below EPA health based standards. "We don't know of any health base standard that classifies the material as hazardous as this point," said Turner.

But for some, it's still not enough. "I don't feel like that they feel like the issues are an issue and it certainly is," said Kathy Little who lives across the street from the plant.

LG&E's general manager says they are continuing to take measures to reduce the dust production. They also plan to keep obtaining additional samples from areas around the plant.

(Copyright 2011 WAVE News. All rights reserved.)