Crib Bumper Pads bumped in Chicago, will others follow? - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Crib Bumper Pads bumped in Chicago, will others follow?

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LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE)- Crib bumper pads are getting bumped from store shelves in one of the busiest shopping cities in the country. Chicago is the first to actually approve a city-wide ordinance that bans the sale of crib bumpers. It's a move that adds one more layer to a growing national campaign for safe sleeping environments for babies.

Erika Janes is with the Child Advocacy Office at Kosair Children's Hospital and thinks it's a smart move.

"Just because it's one more thing that could actually suffocate a child," Janes said adding, "we have educated, we have promoted not using these, we've promoted a blank crib, an empty crib, you know just use a blanket, a light blanket on your child and we're still losing babies."

Victoria George with the Keeping Babies Safe organization believes that banning crib bumper pads will be the next big push. "Chicago has taken quite a big step, and we feel this is going to be a nationwide movement" George said.

Keeping Babies Safe is one of the leading organizations that lobbied for safer crib standards and got them. A new law went into effect this past June. The organization has also teamed up the with the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Consumer Product Safety Commission to produce an educational video about safe sleep environments for babies. The video is now airing in 1100 hospitals across the country, including Kosair Children's in Louisville. And it's reaching an estimated 60% of all new mothers.

Keeping Babies Safe was founded by Joyce Davis when she lost her own 4-month old in a crib-bedding tragedy.

"If there's any chance that a product could endanger your child, why chance it?" Davis said.

Along with the video, experts like Janes also teach the ABC's of safe infant sleep. "Always alone, on the back and in a crib" Janes said and adds to it, "that crib should be bare except for a tight fitting mattress, one teeny little blanket or a sleep sack."

As for the crib bumpers, "all those things continue to contribute to these sudden unexpected deaths and tragedies that parents will never get over" Janes said.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission is currently conducting research on the safety of crib bumpers and George believes clear evidence regarding their lack of safety will soon be published.

For more information on the Keeping Babies Safe campaign:

www.keepingbabiessafe.org