Mother, daughter released from hospital after deadly tornado kil - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Mother, daughter released from hospital after deadly tornado kills son

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CHELSEA, IN (WAVE) - A mother and daughter are home recuperating from broken bones and broken hearts after they were released from the hospital.

Both of them are survivors of a deadly tornado. The woman's son and grand-parents didn't make it. WAVE 3 discovered the mother held onto her children in a bathtub as the storm passed.

Terry and Carol Jackson, both 70, and Daylynn Jackson, 4, were killed when an EF 3 tornado leveled the home where they took cover.  Daylnn's mother took the little boy and his sister to the Jackson's home to take shelter from the storm.

WAVE 3 discovered the mother and little girl were released from Kings Daughters Hospital in Madison, Indiana. They suffered non-life threatening injuries.

Much like the lives of the Jackson family, a sink is turned upside down in the field where first responders found the bodies of the deceased. "They were in the middle bathroom.  She put them in the tub," said Teri Kleopfer, a relative of the Jacksons.

Emergency crews said the mother's instinct may have saved her little girl's life.  The mother, whose name WAVE 3 is not reporting out of respect for the family, wouldn't let go of her children as the tornado swept through.  The woman's daughter suffered a few broken bones, but her son died from blunt force trauma.

The family is asking their photos not be aired or published. "I just think she wants her privacy. And I can't blame her. Her body is trying to heal.  Her mind is trying to heal," said Kleopfer. "She came back and visited the site.  Everything you do in something like this evidently must be a healing process."

As the family heals from heartache and physical injuries, Mother Nature is adding insult to injury – fanning the flames of debris removal.  Crews burnt large piles throughout the day.

"We've got a lot of dangers out here with metal flying around.  We just got to make sure we're not putting people in danger and that we're staying upwind with all the things flying around," said Walsh Construction's Adam Birchfield.

Debris removal is expected to take months.  And this if companies and volunteers continue donating their time.

Private funeral services will be held Thursday and Friday.

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