Police bring in forensic anthropologists to dig Gibson's yard - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Police bring in forensic anthropologists to dig in Gibson's yard

Police cordoned off Gibson's New Albany neighborhood. Police cordoned off Gibson's New Albany neighborhood.
Crews outside Gibson's home. Crews outside Gibson's home.
A large group of people in Gibson's backyard where Stephanie Kirk was found buried April 27. A large group of people in Gibson's backyard where Stephanie Kirk was found buried April 27.
Clyde Gibson (Source: Floyd County Jail) Clyde Gibson (Source: Floyd County Jail)
Stephanie Kirk (Source: Kirk family) Stephanie Kirk (Source: Kirk family)

NEW ALBANY, IN (WAVE) –  Investigators got back to work in a suspected serial killer's backyard.

Police say they were searching for new evidence, and the potential of more human remains. Through their investigation they were led to a couple of specific areas by cadaver dogs, so they brought in extra help to start digging. 

After several days of peace and quiet, William Clyde Gibson's house became an active crime scene again. 

"A lot of people are still in shock that they are still searching and whatever is going on down there, a lot of people still in shock and it's still scary," said Glenda Davis Eubanks, neighbor. 

Around 2:15, on Monday afternoon, the perimeter went up, crews moved in, and the shovels came out. 

Joining New Albany Police Officers were forensic anthropologists from the University of Indianapolis. Major Keith Whitlow says it didn't take long for them to call it a day. 

"Especially the professor, he is able to look at the ground and make determinations as to disturbances and any timeline on something being dug up," said Whitlow. "They don't waste a lot of time, they know what they are doing and how to evaluate the soil."

Whitlow says they brought the anthropologists in to check out two spots in Gibson's yard on the heels of searches with cadaver dogs and ground sonar equipment.

But by 5:00, no new evidence was uncovered. "It's possible that the cadaver dog hit on the odor of decomposition that was there from the previous find out here a couple of weeks ago," said Whitlow. 

35-year-old Stephanie Kirk's body was found in Gibson's yard a little more than two weeks ago. Right now Gibson is charged in two murders, for the death of 75-year-old Christine Whitis and the 2002 death of 46-year-old Karen Hodella. 

Police say their investigation is not over, and neighbors say they know better than to believe this is the last time they will see them on Woodbourne Drive. "No, I think they still have a long ways to go over there," said Eubanks.

Police tell us they are contemplating on whether to search other sites, but they won't release where. No relief in sight anytime soon for neighbors because police say this investigation is not over.

[RELATED STORY: New Albany police evaluate evidence found 800 miles away in Gibson case]

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