Bedside spa service at Louisville hospital - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Bedside spa service at Louisville hospital

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Stephanie Rosenthal receives a massage while on bed rest in the hospital. Stephanie Rosenthal receives a massage while on bed rest in the hospital.
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LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - In room spa service is one of many cool new additions taking place as Norton Suburban Hospital is transformed into Norton Women's & Kosair Children's Hospital in St. Matthews.

Stephanie Rosenthal whose been on the antepartum unit since May17 is the first patient to use the service. She's delivering twins and was put on bed rest when she started having early contractions.

It was Rosenthal's mom who decided she needed some TLC. "My mom said you need to do this and who am I to argue and she said I'm paying for it!" Rosenthal said.

Charlotte Ipsan is the hospital president and said while quality care and safety are expected, it is these extra special touches that make a huge difference.

"Spa services and valet service, kind of just wrapping our arms around our patients and their families" Ipsan said, "and some distraction things that really is scientific that it helps you get better faster."

Norton Women's Care has teamed with nearby Joseph's Salon and Spa to provide the services. The patient simply calls Joseph's and makes the appointment. The employees come right to the hospital room and turn the room into a spa experience with soothing music and aromatherapy.

Patients can get everything from a $35 manicure to an $85 hour long facial and massage.

Stacy Thomas with Joseph's said it is a perfect fit. "The way that the healthcare trend is going, it's just a wellness trend and the power of healing the power of touch."

Rosenthal isn't sure how much longer she'll remain hospitalized, but is breathing easy with expert care and a lot of extra special pampering.

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