Gun buyback closes early when organizers run out of money - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Gun buyback closes early when organizers run out of money

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A line of people selling their guns to the New Albany Police Department stretched outside the Ekin Avenue Recreation Center. A line of people selling their guns to the New Albany Police Department stretched outside the Ekin Avenue Recreation Center.
Several people could be seen holding the guns they planned to sell. Several people could be seen holding the guns they planned to sell.
This man displayed the guns he planned to sell. This man displayed the guns he planned to sell.
A steady stream of people showed up for the buyback. A steady stream of people showed up for the buyback.
The buyback program was so popular, all of the money allotted for the event was given out in less than two hours. The buyback program was so popular, all of the money allotted for the event was given out in less than two hours.

NEW ALBANY, IN (WAVE) - Hundreds of guns are ready to be destroyed while their former owners are little richer.

New Albany police said their first ever gun buyback was a success and a quick one too. If you weren't one of the people standing in line outside the Ekin Avenue Recreation Center before the doors opened at noon, you missed your chance to get cash for the gun.

Mayor Jeff Gahan said they bought back 249 guns, which included everything from handguns and pistols to shotguns and even two assault rifles. They had a budget of $50,000 that was gone less than two hours after they opened the door.

"They are guns that won't be stolen they're guns that won't be left out where someone won't get to them. That's the purpose. Not to take anything from responsible gun owners," said Chief Sherri Knight who believes the successful event makes the city safer.

An unscientific poll of the people getting cash for their guns is mixed on whether it helps reduce crime. "I have no clue. I'm not going to say it does or doesn't, but it can't hurt," said Tyler Rudy, though all of them were happy to get cash for their weapons, which would have otherwise just collected dust.  

Knight said they will check all the guns to make sure none of them are illegal or have been used in a crime. She said they are working with a company who will then shred them.

The money for the program came from Public Works and private donations. If they can collect enough again, Knight said they will host another buyback.

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