Louisville's 2012 murder rate more than just a number - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Louisville's 2012 murder rate more than just a number

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Revondia Beason believes someone knows something about her cousin's unsolved murder but is afraid to come forward. Revondia Beason believes someone knows something about her cousin's unsolved murder but is afraid to come forward.
Beason holds a photo of her cousin Andre Ballard who was shot and killed on November 20. Beason holds a photo of her cousin Andre Ballard who was shot and killed on November 20.

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - A funeral is how Dante Newsome's family is saying goodbye to 2012. The 20-year-old's family already marked Christmas Eve with his murder.

Newsome's family is just one of many Louisville families now left with only pictures of their loved ones. The year is winding to a close with a murder rate higher than the past four years. Sixty-nine people lost their lives at the hands of someone else in 2012.

"What's going on that you have to kill somebody, that you're not valuing life?" asked Revondia Beason. "What's going on that you can't give somebody a chance to live?"

Beason's cousin, Andre Ballard, 43, said she's had enough. Ballard was killed on November 20. Police said Ballard was an innocent father leaving work who was robbed, shot and killed.

"It's scary for me as a mother to have my children to go anywhere," said Beason.

She knows how similar her cousin's death is to so many of the other killings. Louisville Metro Police said four out of every five murders in 2012 were committed with a gun. Ballard's killers are also some of the many still running free. Twenty-nine of Louisville's murders from 2012 are still unsolved.

"I'm mad because I do want somebody to come forward," Beason said. She added that she knows someone out there has information about her cousin's murder, but they won't speak up. "What do you do when these people can't talk?" she said. "They're afraid."

Beason said fixing that problem is up to every single person who lives in the city. "There needs to be something that, ‘Hey, if you come help us out, we're going to make sure you're safe,'" Beason said. "Tomorrow it could be your mother, your brother, your uncle, your cousin. Help us out so the same thing won't happen to you."

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