Indianapolis EMS tragedy on the minds of Metro EMS workers - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Indianapolis EMS tragedy on the minds of Metro EMS workers

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Paramedic Angela Brown Paramedic Angela Brown
Lt. Col. Lee Dennison Lt. Col. Lee Dennison
Sgt. Justin Scharrer Sgt. Justin Scharrer
The wreckage of a Metro EMS ambulance that was involved an accident. The wreckage of a Metro EMS ambulance that was involved an accident.
Indianapolis EMS workers Cody Medley and Tim McCormick. Indianapolis EMS workers Cody Medley and Tim McCormick.

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Louisville EMS workers will be in Indianapolis for a public memorial service Wednesday for two EMTs killed on the job Saturday when a driver crashed into their ambulance.

Louisville EMS workers know how dangerous the job can be and feel lucky that they've only experienced close calls in the River City in recent years.

"It's very emotional," said Louisville Metro paramedic Angela Brown, who will be attending the Indianapolis service along with four co-workers and the Metro EMS Honor Guard.

Hearts are heavy this week as emergency service workers mourn their two colleagues two hours away. 

"It's fresh in their minds, you know," said Metro EMS Lieutenant Colonel Lee Dennison of the deadly crash and how it's affecting the men and women he works with. "It's like hey this could happen to us at anytime."

Friends say EMT Tim McCormick, 24, and paramedic Cody Medley, 22, were always eager to take on the challenge of a demanding job. Indianapolis Police say a 21-year-old woman who admitted she had been drinking ran a red flashing light and crashed into them.

"It's like, it hit somebody in your own immediate family even though we're not blood related, we still share something," said Brown.

Outside the Louisville EMS headquarters there's a sobering reminder that what happened in Indianapolis can happen here or anywhere. A badly wrecked ambulance is all that's left after a driver slammed into it last summer with two Louisville EMTs in the cab.

"They (EMTs) came up to an intersection and the car ran through the intersection and hit them," said Dennison, "and it knocked them on their side and shoved them about 20 feet onto the sidewalk."

Luckily, the two weren't seriously hurt, but their friends know another day can bring another danger. 

"It's a constant challenge anytime you are using lights and sirens," said Sergeant Justin Scharrer, a Louisville EMT.

"To get to a scene, obviously you want to get there for that citizen as quickly as you can for their medical emergency," Scharrer said, "but you have to practice your training and your safety and your skills to get there, otherwise you become the emergency."

If you see or hear an ambulance you should always pull over to the right or at least slow down and try to pull over.

The public service will be held Wednesday morning at 10 a.m. on the campus of Butler University.

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