Company tests new breast cancer screening tool - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Breast cancer screening bra being tested

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SAVANNAH, GA (WTOC) -

Mammography is still considered the gold standard for detecting breast cancer.

But, a company in Reno, Nev., is developing a new screening tool that's non-invasive, non-compression - and according to its testing - accurate.

Matthew Benardis from First Warning Systems said there are sensors in the fabric.

He said they can detect temperature changes in a woman's breasts, which could possibly signal breast cancer.

"We ask women to wear this bra for 12 hours once a year starting at age 18 as part of their annual healthcare screening," said Benardis. "Data is acquired over that 12-hour period, sent to our company by the women's physician, we interpret it and send it back to their physician in under 30 seconds and at that point the patient and physician can consult on what the next step should be."

Sixteen sensors, eight on each breast, collect the data. Five different algorithms analyze the information. The results come back as one of four possibilities; normal, a benign lesion, suspicious or positive. And according to clinical trials, Benardis said the bra is accurate.

"And against the screening mammogram in young and dense breasted women we're showing false positives false negative rates of between 5 and 9 percent versus 35 to 38 percent in the screening mammogram," said Benardis.

And the key demographic for this bra is the group of women most under served, women under 40 and those with dense breasts.

First Warning Systems hopes to have its bra available for public use in the middle of next year.

WTOC took this information to the Medical Director at the Lewis Cancer and Research Pavilion at St. Joseph's Candler to get his opinion on this experimental diagnostic tool and after reviewing it, Dr. Howard Zaren responded by saying, "It's too early to tell".

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