Chances Good That Camm Will Face Second Trial - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Chances Good That Camm Will Face Second Trial

By Craig Hoffman

(NEW ALBANY, Ind., August 11th, 2004, 3 p.m.) -- On Tuesday, an Indiana court of appeals overturned the triple murder conviction of former state trooper David Camm. Now prosecutors must decide if they want to try Camm a second time. WAVE 3's Craig Hoffman reports.

Prosecutors and attorneys have a lot of decisions to make now concerning David Camm: whether or not he will be tried again in Floyd County, who the judge will be and where will the jury pool come from? Jurors were brought in from Johnson County during the first trial.

Camm's trial in New Albany in 2002 was Floyd County's most expensive trial ever, and a second trial could be just as costly to taxpayers.

Floyd County Prosecutor Keith Henderson is staying in close contact with the state attorney's general office. People close to Henderson say they are 90 to 95 percent sure he will prosecute Camm a second time.

People we talked to Wednesday were split on whether or not Camm should be tried again for the murder of his wife, Kim, and their two children, Bradley and Jill on September 28, 2000.

"I don't think they should let him go," says Marty Thompson from Lanesville, Ind. "It's going to cost a lot of money, yeah, but they're gonna let him go if they don't. What are they going to do, let a murderer out on the street?"

Amber Hardesty from New Albany thinks it'll be hard to find a fair jury. "If they do it in town, everybody knows about it, so I don't see how they'll get a jury." She says a second trial would be "a waste of time and money."

Bill Grimes, the chief prosecutor in neighboring Clark County, says Camm must stand trial again regardless of the cost.

"I think any taxpayer that believes in government doing the right thing will say whatever it costs, it's worth it. And you've got three lives that were lost because of a man's greed and whatever. And the cost should basically go aside."

Grimes points out that Henderson didn't prosecute Camm the first time, so this will be like a new case for him. Grimes says he has no doubt Henderson will try Camm a second time, it's only a question of when that decision will be made.

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Online Reporter: Craig Hoffman

Online Producer: Michael Dever

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