Exercise pays off at any age - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Exercise pays off at any age

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GULFPORT, MS (WLOX) -

At 65, Gail Crowell is a retired attorney, who shows up at Bayou View Fitness Center in Gulfport four days a week. She's on a mission to stay as strong and healthy as possible, so she can continue to enjoy her life.

"I have so much energy and it's so easy to get up every day and be ready for the day."

Gail has always been health conscious, watching what she eats and staying active. But just over two years ago, she added a personal trainer to the equation.

"I love to exercise, and we have a lot of fun with our sessions. Every session is a new experience, and he changes it up."

Trainer Stephen DeFazio from Sea Cross Training says many people don't realize how important it is to exercise the "right way" with proper form. That's one of many areas in which a trainer can make a huge difference.

"Gail has developed that lean tissue in a way that supports her frame, in a way that a lot of people could benefit from."

He says if you exercise the right way, you're more likely to stick to it, and the benefits are numerous.

"It's the best way to avoid injuries, the best way to establish a strong foundation, and be better able to enjoy good quality of life."

And what Gail learns at the gym, carries over into her everyday life.

"When I get on a plane now and I have a carry-on, I put it up with no problem and then ask the guys around me if they need help with their luggage."

DeFazio says fitness is important at any age, but becomes even more important as we get older.

"As we age, our bodies break down. We notice our alignment gets worse, we begin to notice imbalances and weaknesses where there should be strength. And when we pay attention to those details, we're able to perform the way we were designed to in a variety of daily activities in life."

Gail says it's well worth the hard work and the financial investment.

"There are no guarantees in life, but I feel if you do everything you can to make your life as good as possible, you can cope with the bad times."

And she says she has no plans to slow down.

"I'm still 25; at least in my head."

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