Louisville trucking company cited for keeping food at 77 degrees - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Louisville trucking company cited for keeping food at 77 degrees

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Officers said the driver was transporting eggs, cream cheese, tofu, clams and pigs feet at a balmy 77 degrees. Officers said the driver was transporting eggs, cream cheese, tofu, clams and pigs feet at a balmy 77 degrees.
Sgt. Jerry Goodin Sgt. Jerry Goodin
Chef Richard Doering Chef Richard Doering

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Indiana State Police officers are working to keep the food we eat safe. As semis carry food from point A to point B, the trailers are required to be at 41 degrees, but a Louisville company has been found to have temperatures nearly doubling that.

Everyday, thousands of semis go through Kentuckiana carrying everything imaginable, but there's growing concern when it comes to trucks like these that carry the food we eat.

"The maximum temperature that it can be in a refrigerated truck is 41 degrees," said Sgt. Jerry Goodin with the Indiana State Police.

Any warmer than that, and food can spoil while in transit and make you sick. It's become such a concern that Indiana State Police started a program about a year ago to pull over food-carrying semis so officers can check in to make sure things are okay.

"They can walk to the back of the semi truck, they can open up the doors, they just put the thermometer in and point it and it will tell the temperature of the inside," Sgt. Goodin said.

What number this device reads determines what happens next.

"If that truck is over 41 degrees and they are hauling food, what we will do is contact the local health department and they come in and make the determination of whether its good or bad,"
Sgt. Goodin said.

WAVE 3 found there's a repeat violator right here in Louisville, so we went to get answers.

Just In Service has been cited twice in 2013 by Indiana State Police for violations when it comes to temperatures in food trailers.

A transportation website lists Just In Service in a complex off of National Turnpike in Louisville, but a man there Monday afternoon said the company moved a couple of months ago.

A voicemail left at a number listed for Just In Service has not been returned.

Just In Service was stopped just last week in east-central Indiana near Richmond in Cambridge City.

Officers said the driver was transporting eggs, cream cheese, tofu, clams and pigs feet at a balmy 77 degrees.

Turn back time to nearly six weeks ago, and the same Louisville-based company was cited for the same thing.

"One of these trucks is too many. When you get bad food you can get sick and or could actually cause death," Sgt. Goodin said.

Restaurants in Kentuckiana keep an eye out on what comes in.

"We check a couple of the boxes as we're putting them away to make sure they're still frozen," said Chef Richard Doering at the Bristol Restaurant in Jeffersonville.

The Bristol is fortunate to rarely have come across an issue, but they know what to look for in case they have to deny a shipment.

"The chicken will start getting a little pale on you and some of the meats will start turning gray," Doering said.

Indiana State Police said a majority of semis they pull over are in compliance, but added that there's the occasional bad apple.

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