Louisville printing house has worldwide impact - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Louisville printing house has worldwide impact

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Tuck Tinsley Tuck Tinsley
The American Printing House for the Blind is the largest printer of Braille products in the world. The American Printing House for the Blind is the largest printer of Braille products in the world.

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - There are so many people, places and things that make Kentucky great. Some you may know and some of them you may not know. 

The world is well aware of the great accomplishments of one of our Kentucky treasures. The American Printing House for the Blind is the largest printer of Braille products in the world. It is the Nation's oldest institution devoted to creating products for the visually impaired. Although the world celebrates this great beacon of hope and independence for the blind and visually impaired, many here at home know little about it. 

"We're known better outside Kentucky than we are in Kentucky," admitted Tuck Tinsley, the President of the American Printing House for the Blind.

The Printing House has been sitting on a corner on Frankfort Avenue for over 155 years.

Tinsley explained its impact, "We're responsible for all legally blind children under college age and in all 50 states, Guam, Puerto Rico, American Samoa's, Virgin Islands and northern Marianas."

The building is 280 square feet with 300 employees. Governor Steve Beshear awarded them with the title of mid-size manufacturer of the year. A title they hold proudly.

"Our charge is to produce materials that aren't commercially available to allow them to participate in their educational programs.  Last year we produced 89 brand new products.  We've got about 1,300 unique products for the visually impaired," Tinsley explained.

The American Printing House for the Blind has recording studios, at least 36 narrators whose voices must be certified by the Library of Congress, a technology department that creates hardware, software, Braille, large print and products.

Again with pride Tinsley expressed, "A lot is done here."

They also showcased a lot for their success in a free museum open to the public.

"It's a magnificent museum. We have 5,000 to 6,000 a year through there," said Tinsley.

The museum is filled with artifacts, photos, displays, talking books, demonstrations of educational products and one of Stevie wonders pianos. At the age of twelve Peggy Traub, a teacher from Kentucky's School for the Blind, traveled on the Motown tour teaching Steveland Morris. The piano was given to the printing house.

American Printing House for the Blind invites you to learn more about the amazing things they do each day.  For more information, click here.

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