Crime-fighting Louisville committee still hasn't met - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Crime-fighting Louisville committee still hasn't met

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A committee formed to help implement anti-violence programs after violence in Metro Louisville still hasn't met. A committee formed to help implement anti-violence programs after violence in Metro Louisville still hasn't met.
Mayor Greg Fischer Mayor Greg Fischer

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - A committee formed to help implement anti-violence programs after violence in Metro Louisville still hasn't met.

Mayor Greg Fischer created the Safe Neighborhoods Advisory Committee, a 30-member group of community leaders, in October. Its mission is to help the mayor's Safe Neighborhoods director develop programs ranging from education to economic development.

But it still hasn't met, confirmed Metro Councilman David Tandy, a committee member, who wasn't sure if the group had a meeting scheduled.

"That's an unfair rap," Fischer said, when asked whether the committee needed to meet in order to be effective. "This is a very dynamic group."

Fischer's comments came after a violent Tuesday in the city, during which seven people were shot. Police had made two arrests in one of the cases, a quadruple shooting at 32nd Street and Virginia Avenue.

The committee and Anthony Smith, the Safe Neighborhood Department's director, are tasked with implementing recommendations the mayor's Violence Prevention Task Force made in October 2012.

Fischer created the task force after three people died and three others were hurt in shootings on May 17, 2012, including one with Metro Police officers present.

Metro Police reorganized their department, creating the VIPER unit, which was nearby when the shooting happened Tuesday at 32nd and Virginia.

The task force disbanded after issuing its report. Smith, the only employee in his department, is to put the task force's ideas into effect.

"There isn't going to be any instant pudding with this, and if people think there is, then they're misguided," Fischer said, when asked how quickly the public should expect results.

Fischer said the city needed to make a "fundamental shift" in fighting crime, focusing on education, family, and programs to help find employment for recently incarcerated people. Louisville won't "arrest its way out of the problem," he said.

The Safe Neighborhood Department's progress report indicates murders are down in 2013 compared with the previous year, but that the number of shootings are up slightly. Police records show more than 180 people shot in Louisville every year since 2008.

Smith declined to be interviewed by WAVE 3 News on Wednesday, saying he didn't have time. He said he would provide an update on his work in the future.

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