Snow's timing confounds school districts' calls to close, delay - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Snow's timing confounds school districts' calls to close, delay

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Stacy Goedde Stacy Goedde
David Ballard David Ballard
Superintendent Chuck Adams Superintendent Chuck Adams

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Several districts thought they had enough information by 5 a.m. to decide whether to close school or delay opening. The timing of Tuesday's snow forced them to reconsider.

Tuesday counted as a full day for Spencer County Schools. Students in grades 7 through 12 didn't miss a minute of class time, despite snowfall interrupting their morning bus ride.

"It was okay," said Christina Heck, parent to a pre-schooler. "The back roads are pretty clear, so I think they'll be okay."

"When the snowfall doesn't begin until 7 o'clock, they were much safer here in school than they would have been to turn around," Superintendent Chuck Adams said.

The same logic of logistics also explained why he put elementary students on a two-hour delay, he said.

Bullitt County Schools began by delaying all openings by two hours, only to back-track and close altogether after the snow hit.

"They should have made that call initially," said David Ballard, a father of two boys, Zachary 10, and Patrick, age 9. "My job schedule works with having them home, but switching gears can really mess up a lot of schedules.

"We had some buses already on the road," transportation director Stacy Goedde explained. "We were gonna have to get the buses back out on the roads and start picking up our high school students. And we weren't able to do that."

Bullitt County had decided to roll buses by 5 a.m., but the snow's timing and strength "took us by surprise," Goedde said.  About five of the Districts 100 buses had students aboard when the district called off classes.

"We were able to get all of them home safely," Goedde said. "If we have to err, we'll err on the side of keeping students safe."

Most Bullitt County roads were clear by 11 a.m., but Ballard considers the decision to close school, the right call.

"Some of the roads we have here do put the buses in a dangerous situation," he said. "Kids' safety is the most important thing."

Adams believes that experience can be the best teacher. But he believes that Tuesday's situation offers few takeaways.

"This is as close to a unique situation as we've had in awhile, with the timing of it," he said. "It definitely was no win."

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