$50,000 recovered from Black Money Scam - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

$50,000 recovered from Black Money Scam

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A suitcase full of the fake currency. A suitcase full of the fake currency.
Real currency found at the scene. Real currency found at the scene.
Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad
U.S. Secret Service Special Agent Paul Johnson U.S. Secret Service Special Agent Paul Johnson

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) – Louisville Metro police and the United States Secret Service are working to warn residents of a scam in Kentuckiana.

On Friday Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad and U.S. Secret Service Special Agent Paul Johnson held a press conference to warn residents about what Conrad referred to as "a scam in our community we had not seen before."

On Thanksgiving night officers responded to a report of a burglary in progress in southwest Jefferson County. Conrad said the officers believed several people inside the home were processing cocaine, but after they went inside they found something completely foreign to them.

According to Johnson, what the officers walked in on, and most likely helped to stop, was the Black Money Scam.

Johnson said the scam is most commonly performed by West Africans who tell victims the money they have imported into the United States is black in color and they need help to purchase chemicals to clean the bills.

To convenience victims to buy into the scam, scam artists show the victim a large amount of the fake black money and clean a piece of real currency covered in black ink.

Johnson said the basic idea is to get the victim to believe the black money is worth much more than the chemicals that would restore the money and in exchange for the money upfront they will give them a percentage of the black money once it has been cleaned.

In reality, Johnson said the large quantity of money showed to the victim is really just blank stock paper which can be purchased at office supply stores.

Johnson is urging people who may have fallen victim to the scam to come forward. "Right now we're sitting on $50,000 in genuine currency that belongs to a real victim," he said.

Anyone that may have fallen victim to this scam, to contact the U.S. Secret Service Louisville Field Office at (502) 582-5171 or if you wish to remain anonymous, you are asked to the LMPD tip line at (502) 574-LMPD.

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