Mother talks about tornado that tore her family, home apart - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Mother talks about tornado that tore her family, home apart

Posted: Updated:
On the afternoon of March 2, 2012 a family of five hid in a closet as their home was ripped from its foundation. On the afternoon of March 2, 2012 a family of five hid in a closet as their home was ripped from its foundation.
Since the twister, the Gilles' home has been rebuilt, in the same spot their old home once stood. Since the twister, the Gilles' home has been rebuilt, in the same spot their old home once stood.
Tricia Gilles Tricia Gilles
Caleb, Colin, and Mia in the hospital. Caleb, Colin, and Mia in the hospital.
Tricia Gilles (right) and her husband Darrell (left) after the tornado hit their home. Tricia Gilles (right) and her husband Darrell (left) after the tornado hit their home.

HENRYVILLE, IN (WAVE) - On the afternoon of March 2, 2012 Tricia Gilles, her husband Darrell, and her three kids Caleb, Colin, and Mia were in their closet.

"I told the kids that it was going to get dark, that they were going to hear loud noises, but that they were going to be okay. God was going to take care of them, and that mommy and daddy were right there with them," said Tricia.

Separated mid-air, a massive tornado as wide as the Kennedy Bridge is long, forcefully tore the family of five apart.

"It took us straight up in the air and started flipping the house and that's when I lost the kids' hands," she said. "That's when I didn't have control and for me that's been something I've struggled with for two years".

Since the twister, the Gilles' home has been rebuilt, in the same spot their old home once stood.

Her children, who spent time in the hospital following the tornado, have physically recovered, but the emotional trauma is still there.

"The kids are starting to now show more of their anxiety so that's getting a little bit harder."

Tricia's 10-year-old daughter Mia can't go to a friend's house for a sleepover the emotional wounds keep her home with mom and dad.

Her brothers Caleb and Colin, now 12 and 13, live life before the T.D. as they call it and after the tornado.

For mom she's recovering from hip replacement surgery after shattering her pelvis during the storm.

"You can never feel sorry for yourself something could always be worse," she said.

And for some in Henryville it is.

Homes are still flattened, construction ongoing and a constant reminder in the sky  that nearly two years ago the town was splintered, torn apart, like the trees that rise above the small town.

Tricia said, "They say time heals everything, and it feels like yesterday still for us, so I hope that time hurries up."

Copyright 2014 WAVE 3 News. All rights reserved.