Fat Albert to thrill crowd during Thunder Over Louisville - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Fat Albert to thrill crowd during Thunder Over Louisville

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The bar in the National Naval Aviation Museum The bar in the National Naval Aviation Museum
The NC-4 was the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic Ocean. The NC-4 was the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic Ocean.
Hill Goodspeed Hill Goodspeed
Dick Wuthrich Dick Wuthrich
Capt. Robert Rasmussen Capt. Robert Rasmussen

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Thunder Over Louisville is not only about the fireworks, but also the airshow. There will be some incredible aircraft soaring over the Ohio River.

At the National Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola, Florida where the Blue Angels are based, more than 150 planes are in the museum, each with an incredible story to tell.

One of the first aircraft visitors see upon entering the museum is also one of the largest. The NC-4 was the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic Ocean. The Navy seized the publicity and sent it on a tour. One of the stops was Louisville. 

Most of the people who saw it in person back in 1919 had never seen a plane before, especially one so big.

It's the older aircrafts that many are looking forward to seeing and hearing. When the T-28 Trojan goes by, it will make a deep guttural sound.

"When a flight student climbed into one of those climbing into aircraft equivalent to a World War II fighter as far as engine power and stuff like that so flight students felt like they had really arrived," said Hill Goodspeed, with the museum.

Veteran Dick Wuthrich volunteers at the museum. He said the plane is special to him.

"It's like revisiting your past every day," Wuthrich said.

This museum isn't just about planes, but the people who flew them.

The restaurant in the museum brings back a lot of memories for people. It looks exactly like the Cubi Point Officers Club in the Philippines and even has the original bar. That bar also serves the same beer, San Miguel.

When the original bar was torn down the thousands of plaques that once hung on the walls were sent to Pensacola.

Capt. Robert Rasmussen is the director of the museum and a Navy veteran.

"I remember after I joined the Navy I remember I found a home," said Rasmussen.

The 83-year-old was a Blue Angel himself in the late 50's, he captured some of his memories in watercolor paintings and sculptures.

He said when you see the Blues perform think of this, "It's much more difficult to fly an aircraft on an aircraft carrier. Especially at night. Than what the blues do." 

During Thunder you won't be able to miss The Blue Angel's Cargo Plane. The huge C-130 is  known as Fat Albert and was named after the Fat Albert television cartoon.

Fat Albert and the others will fly over pretty quickly. So take it all in, a part of history, in the Kentuckiana skies.

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