Some say Edelen played politics with JCPS audit - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Some say Edelen played politics with JCPS audit

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Democratic Auditor Adam Edelen Democratic Auditor Adam Edelen
A long-anticipated audit of Jefferson County Public Schools found the district paid hundreds of administrators big money while its teachers dipped into their own pockets to buy classroom supplies. A long-anticipated audit of Jefferson County Public Schools found the district paid hundreds of administrators big money while its teachers dipped into their own pockets to buy classroom supplies.
Carol Haddad Carol Haddad

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - A long-anticipated audit of Jefferson County Public Schools found the district paid hundreds of administrators big money while its teachers dipped into their own pockets to buy classroom supplies.

Democratic Auditor Adam Edelen released the results of his investigation Wednesday. Critics accused the possible candidate for Kentucky governor of using the audit for political gain, something Edelen denied.

Edelen pushed an issue raised in the audit, JCPS' lack of protection of student data against a cyber attack, during the legislative session earlier this year. Information technology problems made up more than one-third of Edelen's audit findings about the school district.

"It's his job to do this, but he has made statements that, after the audit came out, he was going to decide whether to run for governor," JCPS school board member Carol Haddad said. "I think that kind of puts it together."

Edelen has said he would make a decision about running for governor after releasing the JCPS audit.

The auditor's office investigation found 369 JCPS administrators made more than $100,000 a year -- more than comparable school districts and more than the executive branch of state government, which has more than double the number of employees, Edelen said.

Meanwhile, more than 90 percent of teachers reported to the audit team that they had paid for classroom supplies themselves, he said.

While data security is a problem at the district, there isn't any evidence that privacy had been compromised, Edelen said.

"School districts are not only expected to provide kids with a world-class education, they are also obligated to protect them and their private data," the auditor said during Wednesday's news conference.

During the legislative session, Edelen pushed House Bill 5 to force governmental agencies that collect personal data to notify people if a hacker had breached their system. Republicans accused Edelen of pushing the bill, which eventually became law, to further his political career.

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