Louisville nixes plans for LMPD driving track off Dixie Highway - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Louisville nixes plans for LMPD driving track off Dixie Highway

Posted: Updated:
Metro Police haven't had their own driving track since 2007, when Louisville sold its track to a developer. Metro Police haven't had their own driving track since 2007, when Louisville sold its track to a developer.
Barry Denton Barry Denton

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - A proposed training track for Louisville Metro Police is on hold after the city ruled that a planned site wasn't suitable for the project.

The Louisville Metro Police Foundation was considering a 99-acre, county-owned site on the Bullitt County line in far southwestern Jefferson County, near the corner of Dixie Highway and Kentucky 44.

Metro government determined the site was in the flood plain and building a driving track and training building wasn't feasible, said Barry Denton, the foundation's executive director.

"We're already starting to look for other land in other places," Denton said. "This is something that we're going to do."

The goal remains to break ground next year, he said.

Metro Police haven't had their own driving track since 2007, when Louisville sold its track to a developer.

Since then, police officers have used parking lots at the Kentucky Exposition Center and the former Louisville Downs harness track. The state's only realistic driving track is in Richmond.

"This would give us the opportunity to have our own and to train the way we see fit in an area that's minutes from Louisville, compared to driving all the way to Richmond," Denton said.

The driving track isn't in the police budget and the department has never had a role in the foundation's proposal, said LMPD spokesman Dwight Mitchell. 

The foundation will pay for the track and training building through donations and grants, Denton said.

The group doesn't have other pieces of land in mind, although potential sites must be flat and have about 25 acres for the track and training facility, Denton said.

Driving tracks are important for police departments because more officers are hurt or killed every year in vehicle crashes than by gunfire, despite what's depicted in television shows, he said.

Copyright 2014 WAVE 3 News. All rights reserved.