Signs asking public not to smoke at city parks and pools vandali - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Signs asking public not to smoke at city parks and pools vandalized

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Letters scratched off a sign at Iroquois Park (Source: Maira Ansari, WAVE 3 News) Letters scratched off a sign at Iroquois Park (Source: Maira Ansari, WAVE 3 News)
Mike Heitz (Source: Michael Williams, WAVE 3 News) Mike Heitz (Source: Michael Williams, WAVE 3 News)
Meredith Kosco (Source: Michael Williams, WAVE 3 News) Meredith Kosco (Source: Michael Williams, WAVE 3 News)
Leigh Lightle (Source: Michael Williams, WAVE 3 News Leigh Lightle (Source: Michael Williams, WAVE 3 News
LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - You can't smoke in public buildings and workplaces in Louisville Metro. Now, Metro government is asking that you not smoke at playgrounds, spraygrounds, and swimming pools where children are gathered.

Signs are up at over a dozen Metro pools, spraygrounds, and parks that say "Children at Play. Thank you for not smoking." The effort is spearheaded by the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness and Metro Parks. While there is no ordinance banning smoking at parks, pools and spraygrounds, Metro Parks Director Mike Heitz said they are simply asking people not expose children to second hand smoke.

[RELATED STORY:Supreme Court overturns Bullitt smoking ban]

"Children are still growing and developing their lungs and bodies," said Metro Parks director Michael Heitz.

According to Centers for Disease Control, secondhand smoke causes numerous health problems in infants and children, including more frequent and severe asthma attacks, respiratory infections, ear infections, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Some of the health conditions caused by secondhand smoke in adults include coronary heart disease, stroke, and lung cancer. Parents like Meredith Kosco, believe the signs are a good thing. 


[RELATED STORY: Gov. Beshear signs bill to ban e-cigarette sales to minors]

"If we can protect our kids even in that one instance, I don't think there is any question that it's the right thing to do," said Kosco.

"We're just asking and we aren't saying the whole park," said Heitz. "We're just saying the area where children are collecting."

Leigh Lightle is a mom and smoker. She thinks the signs are good thing. She just wishes the signs at Iroquois Park were more noticeable.

"It's the same color as the tree," said Lightle.

Well, someone did notice and didn't like them. The signs haven't been up for very long already three of them have been vandalized.

"Somebody must have taken offense," said Heitz.

Two at LaPorte Park in the Portland neighborhood and recently one at Iroquois.

"It's public money, public use and anytime anyone vandalizes it, all of us have to pay to have it replaced," said Heitz.

Paying for the signs comes from a grant from the CDC. The wooden signs at the three Olmsted Parks - Cherokee, Iroquois, and Shawnee - cost around $250 because those three signs had to meet certain design standards. The remaining signs are made of metal and are not as costly.

WAVE 3 News is expecting to learn more about the signs on Thursday.

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