Archaeological site in Clarksville finally being archived - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Archaeological site in Clarksville finally being archived

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WAVE 3 News was there in 2004 as archaeologists first began the work. (Source: WAVE 3 News) WAVE 3 News was there in 2004 as archaeologists first began the work. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Scott Johnson (Source: WAVE 3 News) Scott Johnson (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Keith Keeney (Source: WAVE 3 News) Keith Keeney (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Mike Turner (Source: WAVE 3 News) Mike Turner (Source: WAVE 3 News)

CLARKSVILLE, IN (WAVE) - Ten years ago when the Ohio River flooded, archaeologists descended on Clarksville. They discovered remnants of a pre-historic settlement that had to be stored away until now.

"Of course when the artifacts were found, historic preservation has been wanting to see closure in that," Clarksville Resources Coordinator Scott Johnson said Monday.

The discovery came after the river flooded in 2004, leaving the erosion along the riverbank much worse.

That's when the thousands of artifacts came back into sight. WAVE 3 News was there as archaeologists first began the work. They discovered a pre-historic Native American settlement dating back as much as 1500 A.D., Keith Keeney, a Louisville District Archaeologist who worked the site, said.

He said they found two burial sites, one of the bodies was well preserved in time. They also found remnants of homes that used the river's resources.

"It was attractive both to wildlife and catching fish was easy," Mike Turner, with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, explained.

The artifacts were stored away in boxes in the custody of the Army Corp of Engineers. They recently received a $50,000 grant to begin cataloging the items. The town is now in talks to have the items brought back to Clarksville.

Excavation is over for now. Rocks have been laid on top to stop the river from eroding the land even further taking more of the town's history along with it.

Archaeologists weren't surprised to find the settlement here. The area is rich in Native American History.

But Keeney said that it was the time that the settlement remained active that is most interesting.

It depicts a time frame when people in America stopped roaming and began laying the blueprints of village life.

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