John Boel braces for another Ironman in scorching heat - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

John Boel braces for another Ironman in scorching heat

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John Boel is getting a little nervous about early forecasts of 98-degree heat on the day of the Ironman. John Boel is getting a little nervous about early forecasts of 98-degree heat on the day of the Ironman.

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - I have to confess, when I heard this would be the last year that Ironman Louisville would be held on the last Sunday in August, I secretly hoped for a classic, hot day.

As I've been monitoring several extended forecasts, the message is painfully clear: Be careful what you wish for.

[GOPRO VIDEO: POV of Boel's 2012 Ironman performance]

They're calling for 98 degrees right around race day, Aug. 24.

"98 Degrees" was a bad boy band, but it's catastrophic when you have to swim 2.4 miles, bike 112, and run 26 in the same day. We haven't had a chance to train for this kind of weather either in what's been a beautiful summer.

Last year, I did a story on the high DNF rate (did not finish) for Ironman Louisville -- as high as 16 percent a few years ago when 400 people couldn't finish.

Five of the seven Ironman events here have had high temperatures at 90 or above. IM Louisville has been ranked one of the five toughest Ironman-distance races in the world, largely because of the weather on the last Sunday in August. I took a ton of grief for that story.

Interestingly, officials just decided to move IM Louisville to October next year, largely because of the heat.

After finishing in a personal best 11 hours and 50 minutes three years ago, I've completely crumbled in the heat the past two years, throwing up and staggering the final 15 miles of the race. I vowed to never go through that again. But I always come back. I have a Cal Ripken type of streak going; I've started every IM Louisville since its inception in 2007.

In one of my many trips to the Norton Healthcare MASH unit at the finish line over the years, where they treat hundreds of vomiting, heat-exhausted athletes when the temps hit 90, a nurse looked out over the wretched scene of agony and said to me, "Isn't this awesome? Isn't this what you dreamed of when you trained all year for this?"

"Good point," I said, wiping the bile from my chin because there was nothing left to heave.

Warm up my cot again, ladies. Here I come.

Follow John Boel on Twitter at @JohnBoelWAVE3.

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