Extended outlooks proposed to help public prepare for extreme we - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Extended outlooks proposed to help public prepare for extreme weather

Tommy Hart talks with WAVE 3 News Storm Tracking Team Meteorologist Brian Goode. (Source: Jeff Knight, WAVE 3 News) Tommy Hart talks with WAVE 3 News Storm Tracking Team Meteorologist Brian Goode. (Source: Jeff Knight, WAVE 3 News)
An early season frost in October took a bite out of Hart's soybean crops. (Source: Jeff Knight, WAVE 3 News) An early season frost in October took a bite out of Hart's soybean crops. (Source: Jeff Knight, WAVE 3 News)
Hart looks out on his Bardstown farm. (Source: Jeff Knight, WAVE 3 News) Hart looks out on his Bardstown farm. (Source: Jeff Knight, WAVE 3 News)

BARDSTOWN, KY (WAVE) - Extreme weather events have made headlines in recent years with six of the top 10 most devastating weather events in recorded history taking place just since the year 2000, costing more than $300 billion and taking more than 2,000 lives.

Now it appears our nation's capitol is taking action.

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Currently, the National Weather Service issues six-to-10 and eight-to-14-day outlooks that indicate the risk for above or below normal precipitation and temperature extremes. Now, the White House is proposing new outlooks that extend out 30 days in advance. This will help indicate Arctic blasts, heat waves, droughts and floods -- all big weather events that can impact community events, particularly outdoor events such as Thunder Over Louisville. One group that's especially interested in this change is farmers.

“The six-to-10-day outlook, I'd look at that religiously, and I used that to help me plan, “ said Bardstown farmer Tommy Hart.

Hart knows all too well how the changing weather can affect his industry and livelihood. An early season frost in October took a bite out of his soybean crops. The impact wasn't severe, but Hart always has his eye out on the weather outlooks.

“You can't overlook them," said Hart. "You just got to be prepared. Part of my preparedness was trying to look out as far into the future weather as I could."

The new outlooks will allow Hart and others to look even farther out.

Hart knows well the fragile relationship between farmer and mother earth.

"People don't realize how close we are. It looks like [farmers] are in abundance. They talk about oversupply. It can disappear just like that, “ said Hart, snapping his fingers.

The National Weather Service has not yet set a date when the new outlooks will take effect, but it already has started adding more detail to the current outlooks in place.

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