Charlestown athlete never runs on empty - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Charlestown athlete never runs on empty

Traci Falbo, from Charlestown set the world record, in Alaska, by running 242 miles in 48 hours. That's like running from Louisville to St. Louis. Traci Falbo, from Charlestown set the world record, in Alaska, by running 242 miles in 48 hours. That's like running from Louisville to St. Louis.
“A 24 hour race, you don't sleep at all. The 48, some people don't sleep. I had to take a couple naps because I was getting dizzy,” said Falbo. “A 24 hour race, you don't sleep at all. The 48, some people don't sleep. I had to take a couple naps because I was getting dizzy,” said Falbo.
While she was flying around the Cherokee Park loop talking to us, I wondered if she gets bored running around in a circle, on the same track, for 24 or 48 hours. While she was flying around the Cherokee Park loop talking to us, I wondered if she gets bored running around in a circle, on the same track, for 24 or 48 hours.

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - So you think you were cool going from a 5k to 10k. Or you doubled the distance from the mini to the full marathon. Or you were able to swim, bike and run the 140-mile long Ironman Triathlon.

Well, that's nothing compared to what Traci Falbo does, in an event where you literally run until you drop.

The idea is devilishly simple: run around a track for 24 hours or 48 hours; the person who runs the furthest wins.

Traci Falbo from Charlestown set the world record in Alaska by running 242 miles in 48 hours. That's like running from Louisville to St. Louis.

"The best way to do it is run as even pace as possible," said Falbo. We tried to keep up with the 43-year-old on one of her shorter 25-mile training runs.

"Twenty-four hours, you have to go out and feel like talking conversationally, and if you're running too fast in that, it's going to be bad in the end," said Falbo.

She is competing April 11 in the 24-Hour World Championships in Italy as a member of Team USA.

She lost 80 lbs when she started running.

"I was totally depressed, unhappy, decided I need to do something," said Falbo. "I tried a 50-miler, 100-miler, 24-hour race, just gone up exponentially."

She averages a 9:45 per mile pace in 24-hour races, 11:53 per mile in 48-hour races. That includes time for restroom breaks, food and naps.

"A 24 hour race, you don't sleep at all. The 48, some people don't sleep. I had to take a couple naps because I was getting dizzy," said Falbo.

At the end of her world record setting 48 hour race, she was clicking off 8-minute miles.

While she was flying around the Cherokee Park loop talking to us, I wondered if she gets bored running around in a circle, on the same track, for 24 or 48 hours.

"You're constantly passing people, or running in tandem with people. You talk and have conversation, listen to your iPod. I never really get bored," she said.

While you couldn't pay me to do that, they don't pay Traci and the other racers much to do it either. The USATF only partially funds the team, so there is a fundraiser underway this week that ends Sunday from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Pacers and Racers Running Store. With your support, she hopes to run 150 miles in 24 hours.

That's like running from Louisville to Nashville.

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