Developers address resident questions over West Louisville FoodP - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Developers address resident questions over West Louisville FoodPort

Project developers from the non-profit Seed Capital Kentucky answered questions and explained the latest developments in the FoodPort. (Source: WAVE 3 News) Project developers from the non-profit Seed Capital Kentucky answered questions and explained the latest developments in the FoodPort. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Residents asked questions ranging from economic development to soil toxicity. (Source: WAVE 3 News) Residents asked questions ranging from economic development to soil toxicity. (Source: WAVE 3 News)

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - In an effort to set the record straight, Louisville Metro Councilwoman Cheri Bryant Hamilton made the West Louisville FoodPort, the topic of her community meeting Monday night.

“There's been some rumors and some misconceptions,” Hamilton said.

Project developers from the non-profit Seed Capital Kentucky answered questions and explained the latest developments in the FoodPort.

[RELATED: Outcry prompts changes to FoodPort project]

Residents asked questions ranging from economic development to soil toxicity.

One resident asked, “The condition of the soil is important, has the soil been tested for toxins?”

Project developers explained the soil on the site at 30th and West Market Streets is contaminated, but project leaders claim nothing will be grown from that soil. Instead, they’ll grow above ground.

Their next concern was how the $58 million project will spur the economy in the Shawnee, Portland and Russell neighborhoods.

[RELATED: FoodPort backers blasted at community meeting]

“We're now concerned about the economy and any possible opportunity for the people. But at the same time we're looking for liabilities that might not be in the best interest of the neighbors,” Reverend Carl Liggin said.

Hamilton said the proposed FoodPort will create at least 200 jobs. Some of those jobs would pay $9 an hour, others $35,000 a year and with those numbers, community members are starting to come around.

“I think it will be a success once it gets off the ground. Once it’s a success, everything else will follow,” resident Arthur Faust said.

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