Louisville grapples with aftermath of violent week

Louisville grapples with aftermath of violent week
Chief Conrad addressed the media after a surge in violence. (Source: Greg Schapker/WAVE 3 News)
Chief Conrad addressed the media after a surge in violence. (Source: Greg Schapker/WAVE 3 News)
Louisville Metro police were called to the 1000 block of S. Hancock St. around 3:45 p.m. (Source: Steven Richard, WAVE 3 News)
Louisville Metro police were called to the 1000 block of S. Hancock St. around 3:45 p.m. (Source: Steven Richard, WAVE 3 News)

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - The shootings started on Tuesday on Camp Street. The second on Jacob, then on Hancock and Friday on M Street. Five people are now dead, killed in four days.

"It's ridiculous," said LaNesha Harris, the mother of the 14-year-old killed Wednesday night.

So what is Louisville going to do? Friday, LMPD Chief Steve Conrad stepped up, promising to beef up patrols in problem areas while blaming drugs and  gangs.

"We will continue to be hesitant to label any situation as gang-related because at times I believe it oversimplifies the terrible situation," he said.

Just one hour after the press conference another group was trying to make their voices heard.

"We have to stop. We have to stop," Troy Hunt Sr., the father of the murdered teen, Troyvonte Hunt, told us during a peace walk.

"I just lost my baby. Like, he was my last son," the boy's mother said.

Most of those at the peace walk were teens.

"I don't know if it's ever going to end or not. I don't know. I don't know if it's going to end," 16-year-old Kansas Douglas, Hunt's friend said.

She says she knows exactly what goes on around her and tried to help her friend not get wrapped up in it.

"I look at it like, if you do your work, go to school, and do what your supposed to do nothing would be bad in life, nothing would be bad," she said. "And I don't think they understood that."

Douglas now joins many others hoping something will give.

"We all want to make Louisville a safer place," Conrad said. "It's going to take all of us working together to make that happen."

The chief gave specific examples of how everyone can make a difference during the press conference.

First, he said people who witness something or have information about a crime need to speak up and help detectives. He said he understands the fear of retaliation, but said people can call the anonymous tip line at 574-LMPD.

He added that parents can start taking a closer look at what their kids are up to and who they're hanging out with. He said parents should check out their social media accounts and look for pictures depicting any gang signs, guns, or money.

He pointed to resources on LMPD's website to help parents.

Finally, the Chief says all others should consider becoming a youth mentor, because sometimes, he believes, all it takes is someone to provide a helping hand.

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