DACA immigrants share fear about their future - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

DACA immigrants share fear about their future

College student Karina Martinez broke down telling us about how hard she works to make it in the U.S. (Source: WAVE 3 News) College student Karina Martinez broke down telling us about how hard she works to make it in the U.S. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
About a hundred people rallied at the federal court house in downtown Louisville Tuesday. (Source: WAVE 3 News) About a hundred people rallied at the federal court house in downtown Louisville Tuesday. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Protesters criticized the Trump administration and his decision to end DACA. (Source: WAVE 3 News) Protesters criticized the Trump administration and his decision to end DACA. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
"This is where I am from," Ivan Luna told us. He says he does not know anything about Mexico since he has lived here from such a young age. (Source: WAVE 3 News) "This is where I am from," Ivan Luna told us. He says he does not know anything about Mexico since he has lived here from such a young age. (Source: WAVE 3 News)

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Immigrants who are part of the Deferred Action for Child Arrivals (DACA) program are concerned about their future in the United States after the Trump administration announced the decision to wind down the program on Tuesday.

DACA was the result of an executive order by President Obama. It allows for people who came to the United States illegally as children under the age of 16 to stay in the country.

On Tuesday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the program would be rescinded and no new applications would be accepted.

Shortly after the announcement, about a hundred people rallied at the federal court house on 6th and Broadway in downtown Louisville.

"DACA is under attack. What do we do? Stand up, fight back," one protester said.

Some who spoke at the rally criticized the Trump administration and said the decision was made by white privilege.

Others asked the country's political leaders to take action to find a more permanent approach for children of illegal immigrants. 

Born in Mexico, 19-year-old Karina Torres Martinez and 21-year-old Ivan Luna said they have concerns about their future in the United States, a place that has been there home since a very young age.

They live, work and go to school as DACA immigrants.

MORE FROM WAVE3.COM
What is DACA? A look at immigrant program Trump is ending
Louisville protesters defend DACA, McConnell stands with Trump
Trump rescinding DACA program protecting young immigrants

Luna came to the United States at age five. 

"I've been living here my whole life," Luna said. "[The] only thing I know is United States, Louisville, Kentucky. It was me, my mom and little sister. It's a little bit scary, because, you know, I don't know anything over there in Mexico. This is where I am from."

Martinez moved to the United States when she was just one year-old. She is in her second year of college and has concerns about her family and her dreams to become a nurse.

"I am going into nursing so that's my number one goal, just finishing with my nursing degree," Martinez said. "I've worked really hard. At one point I had three jobs just to pay for school. All we want is just to work legally and do everything the right way."

Critics of DACA argue it was created unconstitutionally and should be created by a law through Congress. President Trump gave Congress six months to come up with a plan.

Copyright 2017 WAVE 3 News. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by Frankly