Thieves turn to technology to break into cars - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Thieves turn to technology to break into cars

Sandra Morris caught the thieves on her security camera, and couldn't believe what she saw. (Source: WAVE 3 News) Sandra Morris caught the thieves on her security camera, and couldn't believe what she saw. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Surveillance cameras captured a group of men unlocking several cars without the keys. (Source: Sandra Morris) Surveillance cameras captured a group of men unlocking several cars without the keys. (Source: Sandra Morris)

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Electronic thieves hit a neighborhood off Manslick Road. On Thursday morning, a family awoke to find several cars broken into, but not a trace of damage.

The Morris family has surveillance cameras on their home that captured 30 minutes of a group of men entering their locked cars without the designated keys.

"See the headlights flash, and he is able to get into it and it looks like he has a handful of keys," Sandra Morris said.

Morris has video of unknown men lurking around her cars just a few steps from her front door. The men enter into different makes and models parked in the Morris family driveway.

"When I saw them, my heart dropped in my stomach because I couldn't believe we had been violated like that," Morris said.

WAVE 3 News Safety and Security Expert, D'Shawn Johnson said the breaks in were made possible with something called a relay attack system.

"They were able to access any car that was in my drive way," Morris said. "We own cars from 1995 up to 2016."

With the make and model information, the handheld device works like the owner's key fob.

"Even if the keys are in the house or in someone's pocket, the signal is going out and the device mimics that signal telling the vehicle to open the doors," Johnson said.

Johnson says the devices are new to Louisville and have a 70% chance of working.

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For Morris that chance is too high to risk her family's well-being.

"The thing that worries me the worst is all of us that live here and my kids are my biggest worry," Morris said. "I fear for their safety above all."

Johnson said there are a few things to prevent yourself from falling victim to the relay attack system. You can keep your keys in a tin box or even your freezer. There are also key fob guard bags on the market.

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