IN DNR search dogs provide a nose for all jobs - wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

IN DNR search dogs provide a nose for all jobs

Fury was in an animal shelter twice before becoming a K9 for INDNR. (Source: WAVE 3 News) Fury was in an animal shelter twice before becoming a K9 for INDNR. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Indiana Dept. of Natural Resources Conservation Officer Jeff Milner (Source: WAVE 3 News) Indiana Dept. of Natural Resources Conservation Officer Jeff Milner (Source: WAVE 3 News)
The team's K9s may possibly be the most requested noses in the state. (Source: WAVE 3 News) The team's K9s may possibly be the most requested noses in the state. (Source: WAVE 3 News)

CLARK COUNTY, IN (WAVE) - Not many of us can say we have jobs that depend solely on our nose.

"The dogs and their nose, it allows us to be more proactive in enforcement," Indiana Department of Natural Resources conservation officer Jeff Milner said.

For conservation K9s, like Fury, their nose is everything.

"Tracking people, whether it be a poacher, or someone who fled from Indiana State Police or any other police agency," Milner said.

For dogs who love to work like Fury, work and play bleed into each other.

"His reward is to play with his master or the Alpha Dog, which would be me," Milner said. "He will work for hours just so he gets to play."

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Area searches, evidence retrieval and out-of-season ginseng enforcement are some of the things Fury and the team are assigned to do. The team's K9s were also one of the first to fetch answers during the Martinsville school shooting.

"It was one of our canines that located a gun that was used in that school shooting," Milner said.

Their nose may possibly be the most requested nose in the state.

"From Ohio River to Lake Michigan, FBI requests our dogs to find firearms," Milner said.

These heavy tasks for the dogs are no walk in the park. However, for Fury, it's probably safe to assume that he's happy about his employment and more importantly his home.

"He ended up in the animal shelter twice," Milner said. "He was adopted and then few months later he was returned. That's when we located him and gave him a job."

Milner probably also feels the same way - grateful for the companionship.

"As conservation officers, we work alone most of the time," Milner said. "If you're one of the K9 handlers, you always have a set of eyes and ears with you."

The IN DNR K9 team is made up of 12 dogs. Among the 12, six are from shelters.

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