More Louisville floodwalls come down, trash island cleaned up

More Louisville floodwalls come down, trash island cleaned up
MSD was able to open two floodwalls Friday. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Debris in the Ohio River turned into trash island at the Beargrass Creek pumping station. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Debris in the Ohio River turned into trash island at the Beargrass Creek pumping station. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Workers hope these visuals encourage Louisvillians to stop littering and recycle plastic bottles. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Workers hope these visuals encourage Louisvillians to stop littering and recycle plastic bottles. (Source: WAVE 3 News)

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Louisville's Waterfront is opening up and looking much better following so many days of rain and flooding.

Friday came with both the good and the bad. On a positive note: "We'll have all the enclosures down by Monday," Metropolitan Sewer District Flood Protection Supervisor JP Carsone said of the floodwalls.

He said floodwaters are receding faster than expected. That led MSD crews to take down the Bingham Way floodwall Friday morning, followed by the Second Street floodwall swing gates at River Road in the afternoon.

>> Get the latest WAVE 3 Storm Tracking Team forecast

Projections have MSD pumping out floodwater through next week and hopefully by Friday, March 9, workers will be finished.

MSD also had to deal with Trash Island.

"Our trash is all over the city, and now and it's very visible," Kentucky Interfaith Power and Light Environmentalist Tim Darst said of the mess left along the banks of the Ohio River.

Even though floodgates were closed at the Beargrass Creek pumping station, Carsone pointed out: "Beargrass Creek is a good size creek. When the water came up, the debris that was on the banks got gathered up and flowed to the pump station."

All that mounting trash became known as Trash Island. A MSD contractor with a boat in the water pushed loads of plastic bottles, other trash and debris into a large excavator.

MSD officials and Darst told us if nothing else, the sheer nastiness of it all is a sobering visual to people who litter up the city.

"Take time to throw things away or if you see trash, pick it up and throw it away," Carsone said.

Trash thrown on the street that goes down the sewer, ends up in our waterways.

"If we're more mindful about how much we consume and how much plastic we use, this really should be our wake up call," Darst added.

MSD pointed out plenty of trash cans Friday where trash was outside of them, instead of in them. Carsone said the mess is only costing taxpayers more money to clean it up.

Darst added people should be more mindful and recycle their plastic bottles.

The city of Louisville has announced plans to organize volunteer teams. Those who want to participate should call Metro United Way at 211 and leave their information. A representative should return the call within 72 hours with assignment information.

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