Great Lawn flooded again; crews must wait to clean

Great Lawn flooded again; crews must wait to clean
High water brings trash and debris ashore in Waterfront Park. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
The Great Lawn was a muddy mess after March's floods. This high water doesn't help. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
The Great Lawn was a muddy mess after March's floods. This high water doesn't help. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Thousands of people will head to Waterfront Park for Thunder Over Louisville in just weeks. (Source: WAVE 3 News Archive)
Thousands of people will head to Waterfront Park for Thunder Over Louisville in just weeks. (Source: WAVE 3 News Archive)

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - It's a repeat story for the crews working down at Louisville's Waterfront Park.

After a bout of severe weather, the Ohio River has swelled up once again, swallowing parts of the park.

"The flood right now it's at 21-some feet and it's supposed to come to 21 from what we hear," Waterfront Park Supervisor Alex Laughlin said. "Which puts it up about halfway up the Great Lawn onto our Harbor Lawn."

This time around isn't as bad compared to where waters were during March's flood. However, it's extra work for the crew, now forced to scramble just weeks before Thunder Over Louisville.

"Work as fast as we can do the best we can," Laughlin said with a chuckle. "Hopefully it goes down soon. The sooner it goes down the faster we can clean it."

Laughlin said there really isn't much they can do until the water recedes. Meanwhile, it is work as usual, doing maintenance in areas they can.

Aimee Boyd, with the Kentucky Derby Festival, said she's not too worried about the river, even with Thunder Over Louisville being a little over two weeks away.

"Most years the river is out of our banks at Derby Festival and at Thunder," Boyd said. "The good news is if the ground is wet you can bring a tarp to sit on. And we still have more than two weeks so a lot can happen in between then."

Plus, she added Thunder is nearly 30 years old. She said she's confident in their contingency plans.

"We've learned down there on the river banks to work around the water, especially when it comes up to the water front," she said. "We'll just move the infrastructure."

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Things are a bit different on the Jeffersonville, Indiana side of the river.

Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore said over the phone on Wednesday they were in the process of recovering from last month's flood waters. The repeat flooding doesn't really help the situation, and the mayor said he's expecting the seating areas to be decreased by about 20 percent.

However, he added there are still plenty of spots for people to come and enjoy the show.

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