Prosecutor In First Camm Trial Knew Boney But Says Case Wasn't Influenced

By Jeff Tang

(NEW ALBANY, Ind.) -- Years before Charles Boney was ever mentioned as a suspect, David Camm was the sole focus for his family's murders. As WAVE 3's Jeff Tang investigates the justice former Floyd County Prosecutor Stan Faith was looking for may have been closer than he ever imagined.

Faith tried Camm in 2002. In that case, unknown DNA found at the scene was never identified, even though Faith says he asked for tests to be conducted.

Last year, the unknown DNA was finally identified as belonging to Boney -- the now convicted murderer Faith never considered as a suspect in 2002 would actually become his client two years later.

"I was his attorney in 2004," Faith said. "Naturally I didn't know I was sitting with a killer. It was a child support case, and termination of his probation in Bloomington."

Faith admits to driving Boney home from jail that day -- going above and beyond the duties of an attorney because of Faith's relationship with Boney's mother that dates back to the 80s.

"I've known her many years, yes, in a political arena," Faith said. "In 1986, when I was first running, she was a supporter."

But Faith says he never met Charles Boney until 2004, well after he prosecuted the first Camm case. Still, it is a bizarre coincidence.

When asked if he intentionally ignored the sweatshirt DNA because it belonged to Boney, Faith replied: "Absolutely not. I would turn in my own mother on something like that."

In fact, Faith has been criticized for the way he handled Boney's DNA, which was unidentified at the time.

"I regret it. I deeply regret it, but the myth that's growing out of this is false," Faith said. " We tested that shirt up one side and down the other."

Faith says that should be enough to prove there was no conspiracy to exclude Boney as a suspect the first time the case was tried.

Faith told us he has "no relationship with Charles Boney other than a professional relationship during a month's time. I didn't know he existed before that, and didn't care -- don't care now."

Faith pointed out that DNA from three unidentified people were actually discovered on the sweatshirt found at the murder scene.

Two female samples were cross-referenced with Indiana's criminal database, but the third, a male sample, was not. Camm's defense attorneys later confirmed that male DNA belonged to Boney, and he was arrested a short time later.

Online Reporter: Jeff Tang

Online Producer: Michael Dever