Federal judge strikes down Kentucky abortion law

Federal judge strikes down Kentucky abortion law
EMW Women's Surgical Center in downtown Louisville is Kentucky's last abortion clinic.

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — A federal judge has struck down a Kentucky abortion law aimed at banning a common second-trimester procedure to end pregnancies.

U.S. District Judge Joseph McKinley ruled Friday the law would create a "substantial obstacle" to a woman's right to an abortion, violating constitutionally protected privacy rights.

Kentucky's only abortion clinic challenged the 2018 law when it was signed by the state's anti-abortion governor, Republican Matt Bevin.

A consent order delayed its enforcement pending the outcome of last year's trial in which Bevin's legal team and ACLU attorneys argued the case.

Bevin spokeswoman Elizabeth Goss Kuhn says the governor's legal team will appeal. She says they're confident the law will ultimately be upheld.

ACLU attorney Alexa Kolbi-Molinas says the ruling affirms that health, not politics, will guide medical decisions about pregnancy.