Meyzeek Middle School students help launch first marshmallow astronaut into space

Meyzeek uses grant to launch marshmallow into space

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Ms. Buffy’s students can tell you a thing or two about making things fly.

Buffy’s participation in the National STEM Scholar Program earned the class a $2,500 grant. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Buffy’s participation in the National STEM Scholar Program earned the class a $2,500 grant. (Source: WAVE 3 News)

“Marvin and Melvin have been in our room all year long,” Buffy said.

Marvin and Melvin are “Mallownauts,” the first marshmallows to make it to space.

The teacher’s Project Lead the Way class has focused on flight and space this year. Buffy’s participation in the National STEM Scholar Program earned the class a $2,500 grant, which they used to fund their experiment.

“Being able to watch the launch from the classroom was one of the best things," Buffy said. "Because they were like, ‘Wow, it’s how far up now? Wow, it’s how far up now? It’s going how fast now?!’”

She added: “I have had the most engagement teaching that project than anything I’ve done in 16 years of teaching.”

The STEM Scholar Program is sponsored by the National Stem Cell Foundation, which is based in Louisville.

“We’re hearing from researchers, from doctors that there aren’t enough people to fill these roles," Eric Gurevich, of the National Stem Cell Foundation, said. "America needs more scientists, so we’re growing them ourselves through the National Scholar Program.”

Before Gurevich started working for the foundation, he made a life-saving bone marrow donation in 2015 to a stranger with blood cancer.

This is one of the first marshmallows to make it to space. (Source: Ms. Buffy)
This is one of the first marshmallows to make it to space. (Source: Ms. Buffy)

“A lot of times people are thinking, okay, this is work that’s happening in a laboratory with Petri dishes and it doesn’t affect them, but through stem cell research, through stem cell therapies, I now have a beautiful relationship with my donor and his family,” Gurevich said.

Science couldn’t keep Marvin and Melvin from getting stale, but their legacy lives on in Buffy’s classroom.

“It’s really cool that we can make connections with stuff that we’re actually learning and see it work in real life,” 8th grader Alina said.

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