Holy Name buildings granted landmark status

Holy Name buildings granted landmark status
Some of the old buildings at Holy Name Catholic Church don't have handicap access. (Source: WAVE 3 News)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - The Louisville Landmarks Commission has voted to designate four buildings on campus of Holy Name CatholIc Church as landmarks.

Catholic Charities wants to tear down the Holy Name convent and the gymnasium to build their headquarters.
Catholic Charities wants to tear down the Holy Name convent and the gymnasium to build their headquarters. (Source: WAVE 3 News)

The designation means plans to tear down buildings - the former convent and the gymnasium - and move forward with the new Catholic Charities Development is halted for now.

It came down to a seven to three vote as the commission voted in favor of designating all four buildings as landmarks that were petitioned. Seven votes is exactly how many were needed to get approval for landmark designation.

Four buildings on the Holy Name Catholic Church campus were given Landmark status on Sept. 19, 2019, making it impossible for them to be torn down..
Four buildings on the Holy Name Catholic Church campus were given Landmark status on Sept. 19, 2019, making it impossible for them to be torn down.. (Source: WAVE 3 News)

Petitioners argued the buildings, located in the 2900 block of S. Third Street, are too big a part of the neighborhood to tear down. The property’s owner, the Archdiocese of Louisville, along with Catholic Charities and Holy Name Parish, says they can’t operate their non-profit operations out of these buildings.

The petitioners know the battle may not be over.

Ann Ramser petitioned the Louisville Metro Landmarks Commission to grant landmark status to four building on the Holy Name Catholic Church which were scheduled to be demolished.
Ann Ramser petitioned the Louisville Metro Landmarks Commission to grant landmark status to four building on the Holy Name Catholic Church which were scheduled to be demolished. (Source: Michael Flynn, WAVE 3 News)

"I'm prepared to keep fighting," said petitioner Ann Ramser, "It's been a long tough fight. There was some animosity directed toward me right after the vote. I was not prepared for that. I was really surprised. They were here representing the Holy Name Parishioners."

Lisa DeJaco Crutcher, the CEO of Catholic Charities.
Lisa DeJaco Crutcher, the CEO of Catholic Charities. (Source: Michael Flynn, WAVE 3 News)

Catholic Charities’ proposed plan would include more parking and building more suitable working areas for their operations.

“I think you heard today from a number of long-time Holy Name parishioners who talked to this commission about how essential it is for the future of their parish that our project should be allowed to go forward,” said Lisa DeJaco Crutcher, the CEO of Catholic Charities, “and it was tremendously disappointing today.”

Catholic Charities says should the buildings they want to demolish stay standing, they won't be able to use them or afford to repair them. Petitioners have argued that the church find solutions that involve turning these buildings into affordable housing.

Fr. William Bowling, pastor of Holy Name Catholic Church.
Fr. William Bowling, pastor of Holy Name Catholic Church. (Source: Michael Flynn, WAVE 3 News)

Catholic Charities and the Archdiocese say they will continue to weigh their options moving forward. The vote could potentially go in front of the Louisville Metro Council.

DeJaco Crutcher said she’s disappointed that the Landmarks Commission didn’t consider the economic hardship exemption they proposed, even at the direction of Metro Council in the first place.

The designation means plans to tear down buildings - the former convent and the gymnasium - and move forward with new Catholic Charities Development is halted for now.

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