Largest collection of Helen Keller artifacts coming to Louisville

Largest Helen Keller exhibit in the world coming to Louisville
A photo shows Helen Keller working at her desk. Thes desk is now on display at American Printing House for the Blind.
A photo shows Helen Keller working at her desk. Thes desk is now on display at American Printing House for the Blind. (Source: Vincent Bradford, WAVE 3 News)

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Louisville is now home to the legacy of a women who is internationally known as a voice for equality.

The desk used by Helen Keller is on display at American Printing House for the Blind in Louisville, Ky.
The desk used by Helen Keller is on display at American Printing House for the Blind in Louisville, Ky. (Source: Vincent Bradford, WAVE 3 News)

The American Printing House for the Blind will have the largest collection of Helen Keller artifacts in the world, making the city a center for the history of disabilities.

The ability to touch, hear and feel an experience is what changes a moment into a memory for people who are visually impaired. When visitors go to the American Printing House for the Blind, people can take in the interactive history of Helen Keller a woman who helped push for equality.

Greg Stilson visited American Printing House for the Blind museum from Madison, Wis., for a chance to learn about his role model.
Greg Stilson visited American Printing House for the Blind museum from Madison, Wis., for a chance to learn about his role model. (Source: Vincent Bradford, WAVE 3 News)

Louisville gives Greg Stilson, who is visually impaired, an opportunity he said he hasn't found back home in Wisconsin ... a chance to learn about his role model.

"As blind person myself,” said Stilson. “To know and to understand her activism is really powerful. To be able to have that here in Louisville and to be able to listen to her letters and archives that are here is super impactful."

Through feeling Keller's letters and bible, hearing her messages and taking in her spirit, the museum hopes to challenge visitors; on the way they see the world and show them how they can channel some of Keller's characteristics and overcome their own barriers.

The museum said the artifacts will be in Louisville for about ten years. Currently, only part the complete collection is in the museum on Frankfort Avenue. The rest of Keller's artifacts will be brought to Louisville after the American Printing House designs and installs a new exhibit.

Museum is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday’s. Custom tours are available

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