ISP trooper involved in deadly shootout with man in April won’t face charges

ISP trooper involved in deadly shootout with man in April won’t face charges

CLARK COUNTY, Ind. (WAVE) - An Indiana State Police trooper involved in a deadly April shooting with a man in Jeffersonville will not face criminal charges.

In a press conference to address the investigation into the shooting on Wednesday, Clark County Prosecutor Jeremy Mull said Trooper Clay Boley, 23, pulled over a Buick vehicle traveling on Middle Road with no working tail lights around 12:50 a.m. on April 29.

Mull said the front seat passenger, Malcolm Williams, 27, was not wearing a seatbelt when he approached the car. Boley asked Williams for identification, but he told the trooper he didn’t have any on him. Instead, he gave Boley his information verbally.

Boley believed the information provided to him to be false after running it through his identification system. Williams then admitted he’d given the trooper his brother’s information.

Clark County Prosecutor Jeremy Mull said Trooper Clay Boley, 23, pulled over a Buick vehicle traveling on Middle Road with no working tail lights around 12:50 a.m. on April 29.
Clark County Prosecutor Jeremy Mull said Trooper Clay Boley, 23, pulled over a Buick vehicle traveling on Middle Road with no working tail lights around 12:50 a.m. on April 29.

At the time, Williams had at least four outstanding warrants out for his arrest. There was also a court order for Williams not to be in contact with the driver, Antonette Webb.

“I think the trooper was using an appropriate amount of restraint, and that he at that time at least didn’t have strong evidence of those particular crimes,” Mull said.

Webb, who Mull confirmed was about nine months pregnant at the time of the traffic stop, began to complain of possible labor pains. Boley requested an ambulance for her, and Williams asked the trooper if he could get out of the car to comfort Webb. Boley agreed but told Williams he had to check him for weapons first.

ISP investigators released this photo of the gun Malcolm Williams used to shoot at Trooper Clay Boley on April 29, 2020.
ISP investigators released this photo of the gun Malcolm Williams used to shoot at Trooper Clay Boley on April 29, 2020. (Source: ISP)

“It seems like he was trying to be compassionate and allow Mr. Williams to get out of the car,” Mull explained. “It would have been safer just having him remain in the car.”

While frisking Williams, Boley found him with a magazine for a semi-automatic handgun. When asked where the gun was, Williams told Boley he left it at home and that he’d forgotten he had the magazine on him.

Boley insisted Williams get back in the passenger’s seat where the window was rolled down. Mull said the trooper told investigators that’s when he saw Williams looking at him from the car with a “blank stare.” Moments later, Boley said Williams brandished his gun, which the trooper tried to get out of his hand. Williams then shot at him and the two exchanged gunfire.

In total, Williams was found by investigators to have shot at Boley three times, and the trooper hit Williams six times. Boley told investigators he tried not to hit Williams because Webb was inside the car. The trooper said she jumped out of the car and ran into the road during the shooting.

Another ISP trooper and a Jeffersonville Police officer arrived shortly after the shooting as backup.

Williams died while being transported to the hospital.

Boley received a powder burn and abrasions from William’s gun. He also told hospital medics he also had a loss of hearing due to the closeness of the rounds being fired.

Boley was placed on paid administrative leave after the shooting while Clark County investigators worked on the case.

Mull said during Wednesday’s press conference that Boley’s use of deadly force against Williams was found to be justifiable. The prosecutor also revealed that after the shooting, Webb recounted to detectives what she remembered of the incident, and nothing that she said contradicted Boley’s account of what happened.

As for why there is no footage of the shooting, Mull revealed that Indiana State Police troopers do not wear body cameras. He also said only two troopers in the Sellersburg ISP post have dash cameras in their cruisers.

Trooper Boley is a military veteran who has served multiple tours overseas as a U.S. Army Ranger.

WAVE 3 News reached out to Williams’ mother who says she’s waiting to share her thoughts on the investigation.

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