Television ad demanding justice for Breonna Taylor broadcast to Louisville homes

Television ad demanding justice for Breonna Taylor broadcast to Louisville homes

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - You may have already seen it come across your TV screen. A 30-second ad demanding justice for Breonna Taylor, featuring a simple message written by typewriter.

The 26-year-old Breonna Taylor was shot eight times when three Louisville, Kentucky, police officers entered her apartment by force to serve a warrant in a drug investigation.
The 26-year-old Breonna Taylor was shot eight times when three Louisville, Kentucky, police officers entered her apartment by force to serve a warrant in a drug investigation.
If you haven't see it already, a 30-second ad demanding justice for Breonna Taylor, featuring a simple message written by typewriter will soon appear on your TV screen.
If you haven't see it already, a 30-second ad demanding justice for Breonna Taylor, featuring a simple message written by typewriter will soon appear on your TV screen. (Source: WAVE 3 News)

Eunique Jones Gibson, who designed and created the TV ad on behalf of UltraViolet and in direct coordination with Black Lives Matter Louisville and Taylor’s family, says they’re standing in solidarity with local activists calling for quick action.

Speaking to WAVE 3 News, Malachi Robinson who works for Color of Change said the campaign was simple by design. Color of Change collaborated with UltraViolet on the new ad.

“We were looking for something that would be compelling and simplistic,” Robinson said.

The ad calls out Mayor Greg Fischer and Attorney General Daniel Cameron. It asks them to fire, arrest and charge the officers involved in the deadly shooting of Breonna Taylor. The ad ends with a link to a petition on JusticeforBreonna.org.

Color of Change, along with advocacy organization UltraViolet, created and paid for the ad in support of Black Lives Matter (BLM) Louisville. The ad will run on local network-affiliated TV stations, including WAVE 3 News, through early August; it’s expected to reach about 600,000 homes.

“The most important thing is amplifying what local activists have been fighting on, fighting for for a long time,” Robinson said.

BLM Louisville organizer Chanelle Helm said Color of Change and Ultraviolet have already amplified her organization through digital campaigns and policy work. She said the focus on TV will hone in on the message.

“This is just one way for folks to know that we haven’t stopped and we’re not going to stop,” she said.

Helm explained that the new ad targets a specific audience and how they get their news.

“To actually get it commercialized, was really like if you’re going to talk about let’s actually talk about it,” Helm said. “It brings it into the home for those who are still watching regular stations. We know that those people are actually the folks that vote.”

A myriad of communications and marketing experts spoke to WAVE 3 News after analyzing the ad.

“Television will always be around,” said Dana Seay, a teacher of African American communications and media courses at UofL.

Although audiences are increasingly getting news from social media, Seay said TV allows for more direct communication.

“That ad to me is very powerful because it gets to the point,” Seay said. “It takes out all of the in-between and it’s saying we want something done and we want it done now.”

Siobhan Smith-Jones also teaches media courses in the UofL Department of Communication. She said the ad was “very clear” but it may not have its intended impact.

“Unfortunately, I don’t think they will likely get what they are demanding soon,” Smith-Jones said. “The problem, and of course why they produced the ad, was because there has been miscommunication on Mayor Fischer’s part and hardly any communication from the Attorney General.”

Aaron Barnes, an assistant professor of marketing in the UofL College of Business, said the ad may elevate viewer importance of the issue.

“Placement on TV can potentially increase the perceived importance of the message by associating it with more traditional forms of media,” Barnes said. “Winning even the perceived support of a broader audience may encourage those who haven’t acted yet to act.”

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