Kentucky officials monitoring for signs of voter intimidation

Kentucky officials monitoring for signs of voter intimidation
Kentucky Secretary of State Michael Adams
Kentucky Secretary of State Michael Adams (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Sadiqa Reynolds, president of the Louisville Urban League (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Sadiqa Reynolds, president of the Louisville Urban League (Source: WAVE 3 News)
As of Wednesday, Oct. 21, Secretary of State Michael Adams' office says 797,000 Kentuckians have voted either in person or by absentee ballot
As of Wednesday, Oct. 21, Secretary of State Michael Adams' office says 797,000 Kentuckians have voted either in person or by absentee ballot (Source: WAVE 3 News)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) – U.S. intelligence officials said an email threatening voters in battleground states is the work of agents in Iran. The email targeted democratic voters in Florida, Pennsylvania, Alaska and Arizona, raising concerns of voter intimidation ahead of the November 3 election. Kentucky officials say so far they have seen no signs of trouble and voters locally continue to stream into the polls for early voting.

“There’s nothing in the law that prohibits an individual staying outside the mandated legal distance and having a sign, or for that matter having a firearm, as long as that person is complying with firearms laws,” Kentucky Secretary of State Michael Adams said. “But we really don’t expect that sort of issue in Kentucky.”

Numbers indicate voters have fully embraced early voting. Statewide, as of Wednesday, 374,000 people had voted in person and 423,000 absentee ballots had been returned.

“We’re very vigilant on all of this,” Adams said. “I know in real time if an address has multiple ballots requested and that’s unusual. If ballots disappear we barcode track all these envelopes so we can track these in the system. So we’ve got a good system in place to catch things like that if they ever happen.”

Both Adams and a spokesman for the Jefferson County Sheriff said they have received no word of any group or individuals attempting or planning potentially disruptive activities.

“But I think it’s always something that we should be paying attention to,” Louisville Urban League President Sadiqa Reynolds said. “People should be allowed to vote in peace without harassment, they shouldn’t be asked for ID that they don’t need and shouldn’t be questioned unnecessarily.”

The American Civil Liberties Union describes examples of intimidation including the aggressive questioning of voters about their citizenship and criminal records, and spreading false information about voter requirements.

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