Sen. Rand Paul defends stance on COVID immunity, reacts to Beshear’s latest restrictions

Sen. Rand Paul defends stance on COVID immunity, reacts to Beshear’s latest restrictions
U.S. Senator Rand Paul speaking with attendees at the 2019 Young Americans for Liberty Convention at the Best Western Premier Detroit Southfield Hotel in Detroit, Michigan. (Source: Gage Skidmore)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) continues to defend his stance on COVID-19 immunity and mask wearing despite pushback from doctors. The senator, a physician by trade, tested positive for the virus in March and has since recovered.

Speaking to WAVE 3 on Thursday, Paul repeated the claims he made on Fox News one week ago that were later debunked by Kentucky medical providers. Paul still argues that lasting COVID immunity is backed by scientific evidence although he recognized that reinfection was real, albeit rare.

The senator also continues to claim that wearing a face mask does not prevent the spread of the virus, citing upticks in COVID cases when mask orders were implemented, although he recognized there may be no correlation.

Paul still argues that lasting COVID immunity is backed by scientific evidence although he recognized that reinfection was real, albeit rare. The senator also continues to claim that wearing a face mask does not prevent the spread of the virus, citing upticks in COVID cases when mask orders were implemented, although he recognized there may be no correlation.

“Why aren’t we willing to admit that it looks like at this point if you’ve been infected you actually have less of a chance of getting reinvested then people who take the vaccine,” Paul argued.

Despite Paul’s claims, the scientific community at large has not only recognized cases of COVID reinfection but supported the use of mask wearing to prevent the spread of coronavirus. When asked who his constituents should listen to regarding public health if not infectious disease experts and local doctors, Paul argued that people should be free to make their own “risk assessments.”

“I think people will make their own risk assessments and it’s not going to be the same for everybody, if you’re in a nursing home you have an enormous chance of dying and we need to do everything possible and go overboard to try and help these people,” he said. ‘But under age 25 the death rate is about one in a million so they may take less precautions.”

Paul said the recent rise in COVID infection was concerning but he believes the only way to prevent further spread is the implementation of a vaccine; he sent a letter to the FDA asking for quick approval.

Paul on Thursday also reacted to Gov. Beshear’s latest round of restrictions made to combat the pandemic.

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