Metro Public Works working around the clock to keep roads in Louisville clear from snow

Metro Public Works working around the clock to keep roads in Louisville clear from snow
Mechanics with Metro Public Works have been working 12-hour shifts to maintain the plow trucks that keep the roads clear.
Mechanics with Metro Public Works have been working 12-hour shifts to maintain the plow trucks that keep the roads clear. (Source: Courtesy: WAVE 3 News)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - For the past week, Louisville Metro Public Works has perfected the process of scooping salt, loading it onto plow trucks and driving it around Louisville. It’s a process Roger Henning has had to familiarize himself with.

[We’ve been] throwing salt out on the roads, getting everything open,” Henning said.

A crew leader at Metro Public Works’ Central District, Henning is also one of roughly 18 plow truck drivers, covering a route that spans from Baxter Avenue and Broadway to Bardstown Road and Preston Highway. The group has transitioned to 12-hour shifts in order to keep 24-hour attention on the roads.

“[It’s a] pretty big area,” Henning said. “[It’s] a lot of road miles. It’s part of an accomplishment, you know? Motorists get out and get around with no problems, makes you feel good because you did your job that day.”

All that driving is bound to cause problems. That’s where Todd Evans comes in. As one of the heavy truck mechanics for Metro Public Works, Evans tasked with maintaining the plow trucks. That maintenance includes replacing 300-pound plow blades, cleaning out the salt spreaders and repairing hydraulic hoses, among other things.

“We’ve just been making sure all the trucks are equipped and greased and ready to go,” Evans said. “Just keeping the trucks up and going, that’s what we’re here for. You know, that’s our main purpose for Public Works for the city of Louisville is keep these roads going in the winter.”

Evans and the mechanics have also begun working 12-hour shifts to make sure someone is constantly available to fix a problem. These men, and others, are flying under the radar, so others can drive around the city.

“From once an event starts, and the feeling of accomplishment by the time we get done, it’s a great feeling,” Evans said. “We know we kept the roads up, where people can go to the hospital if they need to, go to grocery, do their daily chores.”

A Metro Public works spokesperson said crews will complete their full routes five times on Monday, totaling more than 13,000 miles driven.

A car getting onto the highway in southern Indiana spun out right in front of the WAVE 3 StormTracker.
A car getting onto the highway in southern Indiana spun out right in front of the WAVE 3 StormTracker.

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