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Cell phone feature convinces Kentucky man that he’s having a stroke

Published: May. 25, 2021 at 4:36 PM EDT
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Bob Pike survived a stroke in March 2017.
Bob Pike survived a stroke in March 2017.(Source: UofL Health)
UofL Health typically treats between 1,000- 1,200 stroke patients a year. More than half...
UofL Health typically treats between 1,000- 1,200 stroke patients a year. More than half involve high blood pressure.(Source: UofL Health)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE)- Every 40 seconds someone in the U.S. has a stroke, according to the Stroke Awareness Foundation. Depending on how quickly someone can detect the warning signs and get them to the hospital could mean the difference between rehabilitation or a lifelong disability.

One Kentucky man almost became part of that statistic, but a unique feature on his cell phone convinced him he needed to go get help.

On March 10, 2017, Bob Pike of Fern Creek was using the voice-to-text feature on his cell phone when he realized it wasn’t interpreting his words correctly. When he went to find his wife, she immediately noticed something was wrong. Pike, 65, was having a stroke and didn’t realize it until he got to the hospital. He spent four days at UofL Health followed by outpatient occupational, physical and speech therapy.

“I often wonder how much brain cell I lost but I don’t want to look,” Pike said jokingly.

Throughout his recovery, family, friends, and hospital workers commemorate Pike’s spirit and positive attitude. It’s motivated him to help other stroke survives. Pike is part of the volunteer peer support team for UofL Hospital where he meets with patients and family members.

“Are you going to be a survivor or a victim,” Pike said. “Figure it out, because you will be what you decide.”

During a stroke, 1.9 million brain cells die per minute. If victims wait to get help, UofL Health says it can significantly impact their ability to recover and could develop a lifelong disability.

They are urging immediate treatment when a person experiences lack of balance or eyesight, speech issues, or facial drooping.

“There are certain treatments and surgical retrieval of clots that are time dependent that you won’t be a candidate for if you wait some time,” said Deidra Gottbrath, a nurse with UofL Health Stroke Resource. “So getting to the hospital as soon as possible is always the best case scenario.”

UofL Health typically treats between 1,000-1,200 stroke patients a year, and more than half involve high blood pressure.

To reduce your risk, they recommend a healthy diet, exercise regularly, lower stress levels, low alcohol consumption, and quit smoking cigarettes. Get more information by clicking here.

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