Kindergartner with sensory disorder gets dropped off at wrong JCPS school

JCPS experienced another school bus mishap when a kindergartner with a sensory disorder ended up at the wrong school.
Published: Aug. 17, 2022 at 11:02 PM EDT
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - Jefferson County Public Schools experienced another school bus mishap when a kindergartner with a sensory disorder ended up at the wrong school.

When Brandy Vazquez-Ayala got home last Friday, she noticed something a little different about her son’s backpack. That detail made her realize that something about her son’s school day wasn’t right.

She pointed the tag on the backpack.

“This is the red tag that they’re talking about that all kindergartners have that they look for,” Vazquez-Ayala said. “That’s got the correct bus, all of that. This is how I knew something was different. It’s got Antonio, it says Brook Kline and Walnut Grove. That’s not his bus stop.”

Vazquez-Ayala’s son goes to Kennedy Montessori, but he ended up at Lincoln Elementary.

“His teacher says, ‘Oh, he ended up at the wrong school this morning,’” Vazquez-Ayala said. “‘Did no one reach out to you?’ No.”

Antonio is five years old and has a sensory disorder. The kindergartner told his mom he’s now afraid to ride the bus.

“Monday I got him, I persuaded him, it took about five minutes to get him out of the car,” Vazquez-Ayala said. “Got him on the bus. Yesterday, it was a no-go. About 15 minutes.”

A JCPS spokesperson said this is something that sometimes happens during the first week of school.

School staff recognized Antonio was at the wrong school and was picked up about 30 minutes later after being fed breakfast.

JCPS said the protocol in these situations is for the school to call the parents, but Vazquez-Ayala never got that call.

“If I wasn’t someone who noticed difference and questioned it, I would have never knew he went to the wrong school,” Vazquez-Ayala said. “Like no one would’ve told me.”

She said if someone would’ve told her right away, she still would’ve been upset, but would’ve understood.

“Call me, tell me,” Vazquez-Ayala said. “Talk to me. I’ll talk to you if you talk to me. That’s my baby.”

JCPS said they’ll be reminding all school leaders that they need to contact parents when something like this happens.

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