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Muslim community welcomes others from out of town

Muslim community welcomes others from out of town
Published: Jun. 8, 2016 at 7:35 PM EDT|Updated: Jun. 8, 2016 at 10:00 PM EDT
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Nasrin Dugla (Source: Dale Mader, WAVE 3 News)
Nasrin Dugla (Source: Dale Mader, WAVE 3 News)
As many as 14,000 people are expected to fill the Kentucky Exposition center's North Wing for...
As many as 14,000 people are expected to fill the Kentucky Exposition center's North Wing for the Janazah service. (Source: Dale Mader, WAVE 3 News)
Bob Gunnell (Source; WAVE 3 News)
Bob Gunnell (Source; WAVE 3 News)
Crews set up chairs and media risers for the Janazah service. (Source: Dale Mader, WAVE 3 News)
Crews set up chairs and media risers for the Janazah service. (Source: Dale Mader, WAVE 3 News)

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - The North Wing of the Kentucky Exposition Center will be filled with 14,000 people Thursday. They will all be in one room and all praying in the memory of one man.

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"No doubt we feel sad when family is gone but I think this is something from God's way," Nasrin Dugla told us.

Dugla, who is Muslim, believes Muhammad Ali left one more gift before he left - the opportunity to bring people of all religions together.

"So many things going on politically and everything, again he chose the right person, Muhammad Ali," Dugla said.

Having his service according to the Muslim tradition was extremely important to Ali when he planned his arrangements 10 years ago with a small group of advisers.

"What you are seeing are Muhammad's wishes and he had a hand in all the planning," said Bob Gunnell, the Ali family spokesperson.

More Muhammad Ali Coverage
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+ Class of 1960: We remember Ali the friend

Ali's death comes during the holy month of Ramadan, when Muslims fast during the day. Once the sun sets, they eat a special dinner called Iftar.
Dugla is one of several local Muslims who plans on preparing Iftar to some of the hundreds of out of town strangers as a way to show Louisvillian hospitality.

"Please come to my house," said Dugla, "my house is open."

Dugla knows this will be the first time some will have ever heard a Muslim prayer, and she is thankful.

"Let them know what is the real meaning of Islam, is peace," she said. "We are all one nation, one God and we are all equal, you know."

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