Brandenburg to Louisville: Give us the monument

Brandenburg to Louisville: Give us the monument
Gerald Fischer (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Gerald Fischer (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Steve Robbins (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Steve Robbins (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Beverly Furnival (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Beverly Furnival (Source: WAVE 3 News)
The statue of a mother and child who appear to be staring toward the Ohio River, toward freedom. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
The statue of a mother and child who appear to be staring toward the Ohio River, toward freedom. (Source: WAVE 3 News)

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - What Louisville doesn't want, Brandenburg will gladly take.

"The trees will be cleaned out," local historian Gerald Fischer said, pointing toward a tree line. "The monument would be right here."

The monument to which he is referring is Louisville's controversial Confederate monument, currently located on Third Street.

Brandenburg's historians and its most popular radio host said the majority of people in the Meade County town want the monument.

"Celebrate is not the right word. We honor our history - good, bad, win, lose, draw, we honor history," WMMG Program Director and host Steve Robbins said.

The monument would be part of a walking history trail at River Front Park, not far from other statues representing testaments to time such as one commemorating the underground railroad. It depicts a mother and child who appear to be staring toward the Ohio River, toward freedom.

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"I think that it is perfect to have a balance between the story of slavery and the fight for freedom and the story of the soldiers who died for the Confederate cause," Beverly Furnival, president of the Meade County Historical and Archeological Preservation Society, said.

In addition, according to the preservation group, the monument has ties to the location because of Henrietta Morgan Duke. Fischer explained that Duke headed the corporation that helped erect the Confederate monument. She also was the sister of John Hunt Morgan, a Confederate general who raided Brandenburg in 1863. Duke's husband, General Basil Duke, was Morgan's chief officer.

"Morgan actually put his cannon on that hill behind the jail," Fischer said.

It's a story Fischer, a retired history teacher, doesn't want erased.

"Hopefully we learn more from the bad things that happen than the good things," Fischer said. "If we do, then we are not likely to repeat them.

On Monday, a judge ruled that Louisville has the right to move the statute. The city is still debating where it will go.

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