Lost Boy of Sudan relieved to finally bring wife, children to Louisville

Lost Boy of Sudan relieved to finally bring wife, children to Louisville
At a press conference Wednesday, the family laughed as one of the kids tried to hide from the cameras. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
At a press conference Wednesday, the family laughed as one of the kids tried to hide from the cameras. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Martin Nhial, his wife Sora, and their children (Source: Jewish Hospital)
Martin Nhial, his wife Sora, and their children (Source: Jewish Hospital)
Sora and Martin Nhial met in a refugee camp and were married in 2005. (Source: Family photo)
Sora and Martin Nhial met in a refugee camp and were married in 2005. (Source: Family photo)

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - He fled a deadly conflict in his homeland in the 1980s to start a new life. Now one of the Lost Boys of Sudan has been reunited with his wife and children in their new home.

Martin Nhial fled Sudan along with the tens of thousands of others who were displaced or orphaned during the Second Sudanese Civil War. He and about 75 other Lost Boys made Louisville their home in the early 2000s.

He now works at Jewish Hospital.

Nhial returned home in 2005 to marry a woman he met at a refugee camp. They had three daughters together as he visited over the years.

He worked for years to save money to bring his family to the U.S. but found himself $8,000 short. That is, until Congregation Adath Jeshurun got together with the Jewish Hospital & St. Mary's Foundation to help.

"The whole huge hospital, we are close here, to organization the synagogue they came, everybody pitch in," he told us. "And I thank the community of Louisville as a whole and I thank the organization of Louisville or KentuckyOne and everyone my teammates, they helped me be who I am today."

Now all together, Martin and his wife, Sora, can begin to plan their future in the United States. Their children are ages 12, 8 and 5. The family was reunited in December.

Nhial also told us this is not the first time he has been helped by KentuckyOne and Congregation Adath Jeshurun. Years ago, they helped him pay for a plane ticket so he could attend his mother's funeral.

KentuckyOne says their fund will continue to help team members and their loved ones who are in dire circumstances.

To donate to help additional families, visit KentuckyOneHealth.org/giving and designate the gift to go toward the "Jewish Hospital and St. Mary's Foundation and Congregation Adath Jeshurun Pikuach Nefesh" fund.

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