Restoration and insurance companies flooded with water calls

Restoration and insurance companies flooded with water calls

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - While Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer says the city's cleanup cost from flooding will be at least $2.8 million, that doesn't include cleanup costs to individuals.

Monday's sunshine came as a welcome relief for some homeowners who could at least start the process of cleaning up. Plenty of people with  flooded homes and cars have been on the phone with insurance agents and restoration companies trying to get some help.

After spending much of the weekend moving furniture from his mother-in-law's flooded Harrod's Creek house, new homeowner William Seldon hoped to relax.

"11:00 p.m. came and that's when everything changed," Seldon said.

It was around that time on Saturday when the sump pump at Seldon's home off Westport Road started going off. He said his wife spotted the water coming out of a drain.

Seldon got video of water gushing from the basement wall, and it kept coming out until 9:00 a.m. Sunday morning. The back flow valve couldn't keep up with the pressure. After moving the furniture to a higher floor, Seldon called Techicare to get the water out and drywall off.

"We have to remove the baseboards to start getting holes to get the wall cavity drying and unfortunately in this situation, all the carpet and pad have to be removed," Technicare owner Shawn Sizemore said.

Seldon says his insurance won't cover it. His agent told him he didn't check the right policy box, which he doesn't believe was the case.

"I chose to opt out of back-ups, which I don't believe I did, especially because I've seen this happen to my parents' house that I grew up in several times," Seldon said.

He believes the lack of coverage on the policy was a cutback by the company to get his business on a less expensive rate.

As Seldon's home dried out, Sizemore was getting flooded with calls.

"You get the first call and they just keep coming in," Sizemore said.

He's not alone.

"I'd call the insurance company immediately," said Mark Whelan, the owner of Chameleon Color Systems Auto Body Shop.

Whelan saw the images of all the submerged cars from the last few days. His advice was take as many photos of your flooded vehicle as possible, to get your insurance to total it.

"A lot of these new cars, all the electronics are under the carpet and it's just like pouring water into a computer, once it's in there, it's there," Whelan said.

Whelan says in his experience, most insurance companies will total a flooded car. He won't even try to fix most flooded cars because he says they are an electrical nightmare.

He says consumers should watch out for totaled cars resurfacing somewhere at auction.

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